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Full text of "Brethren's Family Almanac, The (1872)"


Ill 



Being tlie Third after Leap' 

Year, and'nntil the fonrth of 

July, the 99th of American 

Independence. 



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286.95 

C47y 

1872 



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PUBLISHED BY 
>J£R, MEYERSDALE SOMERSET Co., Pa., & 

BRUMBAUGH & Brc, Huntingdon, Fa. 



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AND CHARITY. 



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1 



ECLIPSES FOR THE YEAR I8?*r^ 

There will be four Eclipses ; two of the sun andHwo of the moom 

The first'is a partial Eclipse of the moon, on the 22d of May, at 5 o'clocS 
9 min. in the afternoon. Invisible here. When the moon rises ia the eve- 
ning the Eclipse has passed. 

The second is an Annular Eclipse of the Sun, on the 5th of Juae, 1$ 
o'clock 17 min. in the evening ; therefore invisible. Visible in Asia aad o» 
the Pacific Ocean. 

The third is a partial Eclipse of the Moon, on the 14th and 15th of No- 
vember. Visible as follows : Begins November 14th, at 11 o'clock 52 min. 
in the evening ; middle, November 15tb, at 12 o'clock 10 min. in the morn- 
ing ; ends November 15th, at 12 o'clock 28 min. in the morning. Duratioss 
of this Eclipse is ouly 36 min. 

The fourth is a total Eclipse of the Sun, on the 30th of November, at I 
o'clock 34 min. in the afternoon. Invisible in the United States on account 
of the mooa's great southern latitude. Will be visible in the southern part- 
of South America. At Cape Horn the Eclipse will be nearly total. 






Moveable 

Septuagesima Sunday January 28 
<^u:aquagesima Suaday February 11 
Shrove Tuesday February 13 

Ash Wednesday February 14 

Palm Sunday March * 24 

Easter Sundav March 31 



Festivals. 

Ascension, or holy Thursday May 
Whit Sunday, or Pentecost " 
Trinity Sunday " 

Corpus Christi " 

First Sunday in Advent Dec. 
Sundays after Trinity ar 



9 
19 
26 
3$ 

I- 
2& 



Domineal Letter. 

The Council of Nice, A. D., 325, decided 
tliat Easter Suaday should be the first Sun- 
day after that full mooa which comes on 
March 21st, or next after that date. To de- 
termine this and similar days, it was found 
convenient to place the first seven letters of 
the alphabet successively against the da ys 
of the month, putting A to Jan. 1st, and re- 
peating the seven letters through the year. 
Ail Sundays in th « year, (except in leap 
year,) will have the same letter as falls to 
the first one: thus fcb/J Domineal letter ena- 
bles us to find on what day of the week any 
given day in the year falls. The Dominical 
letter for any year from 1870 to 1899 may be 
found in the following table : 



AD| 0J_1 | 8 { 3 } 4 
•187.' B I 'A. (01 
188,DC! B A 

189| E I D ;C B 



| 8 | 9 



\ E 


D 


C B A 


G 


F 


G 


E F 


D 


C 


B 


AG 


V A 


G 


F 


ED 


C 


B 



Find the first three figures of the date in 
the left hand column, and iu linewiih these, 
under the last figure of the date (found at 
the top) is the letter sought. For leap year 
there are two letters ; the first serves for 
January and February, the other for the oth- 
er ten months. 



Table showing ok what day of the week' 
any day of any month falls. 



January, October, A B C D E F r G 

Feb., March, November, D E F G A B C 
April, July, G A B D E F 

May, B C D E F G A 

June, E F G A B C [D 

August, C D E F G A B 

September, December, F G A;B C D E 
Find the Dominical let- 1 2 3| 4 5! 6| 7 
ter for the year by the 8 9j 10 11 12:13,14 
previous table, then in 15 16il7|18 19J20 Si 
this table find that letter 22 23 24125 2&27 2* 
in a line with the month 29 3J|3l| 
in question, and the figures below ia the col- 
umn containing the letter will be the Sun- 
days of that month, from which reckon back- 
ward or forward to the day of the week 
sought. 

Example: On what day of the weeii vrUi- 
J the 4th of July be this year? Tbis being a* 
j leap year by the first table, the Dominical 
I letters for 1872 are G F. F serves iof tfeft 
I ten months after February. This letter, id 
| the second table, in line with July, comes ii> 
J the seventh column, and by moving the eye 
j downward we find Sunday will be the Itfrj 
i hence the 4th of July will be on Thursday. 



ASTRONOMICAL CHARACTERS EXPLAINED, 



9 New Moon, 
O Full Moon, 
D First Quarter, 
d Last Quarter, 
kj Moon'sAscension. 



5j Saturn. 
% Jupiter. 
% Mars, 
Sun. 



9 Venus 
V Mercury. 
® Earth C Mn 
y Herschel. 



£5 Moon's ascending Node, or Dragon's head. 
Q Moon's descending Node, or Dragon's tail. 
p> Moon's Descension. 

D Moon in Apogee — furthest from the earth. 
d Moon in Perigee — nearest to the earth. 

:o: 

rLANETS AND ASPECTS. 

6 Conjunction or planets in the same longt. 

* Sexile, when they are €0 dp^rrees apart. 

□ Quartile, when they are 90 degs., distant. 

A Trine, when they were 120 degs., distant. 

:o: 



SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC, OR HUMAN ANATOMY. 
The Heai> and Face.— v ARIES. The Ram. 



Arms, 
jft GEMINI. 

Heart, 
.«P LEO 

Reins, 
jfc LIBRA. 

Thighs, 
.& SAGITARIUS, 

Legs, 
g$> AQUARIUS. 

The feet, 
2 PISCES. 




The Head & Face, 
ft? ARIES. 

Neck. 
^ TAURUS. 

Breast, 
i*ge CANCER. 

Bowels, 
fe VIRGO. 

Secrets, 
^$g SCORPIO. 

Knees, 
^CAPRICORN 



K The Fishes.— The Feet. Pisces. 



Dominicil Letter 

Epacts 

Roman 1 1) diction 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES; 

G. F Golden Number, or Lunar Cycle 

20 Solar Cycle 
- 15 Julian Period 



11 
5 

6585 



THE FOUR SEASONS OR CARDINAL POINTS. 
Vernal Eh ■•., ox, O enters V the 20th March, 1 o'clock 40 min. Morning 
Summer S< lstici O enters s the 20th June, 10 o'clock 20 min. Evening. 
Autuma.nl Equinox O enters * the 22 d Sept. 12 o'clock 41 min. Afternoon. 
Winter Solstice O enters V? the 21st Dec, 6 o'clock 42 min.. Morning. 



EMBER DAYS. 

Kebraary 21.— May i>l\— September 18.— December 18. 

The Jewish Era with their year 5633 commences at the 3d of October, 1872. 
The Mohamedan Era with their year 1289 commences at the 11th ot May,ia(*. 



FIRST MONTH. 



J"4£t:rL-UL£t,:ry- 



31 DAYS. 



p 

$_ 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



Remarkable 
Days. 

1 New Year. 

2 Abel, Seth 

3 Enoch 

4 Methusalerii 

5 Simon 

G Epiphany 



Moon 
South, 
h. m. 



Moon 
r. &b. 

h. m. 



Moon's 
pi noon 
sig deg 



Aspects of Planets, and otherl 
miscellaneous matter. I 



slow 



Sun 8nn 

rises, sets. 

'h. mJh. m 



4 42 


10 59 


fc26 


5 32 


11 44 


A 9 


6 18 


morn. 


A 24 


1 8 


12 40 


* 1 


7 58 


1 32 


Hp21 


8 46 


2 41 


#* 6 



6 $ O- Inferior. p\ 
9 rises 3 39. 
3d. 6 k O- 
7* south 8 40. 
9 gr. Hel. Lat. N. 
Sirius south 11 30. 



23 4 37 
23|4 37 
23|4 37 

22 4 38 

22 4 38 
22 4 38 



1 1st Sunday after Epiphany. Luke 2. Day's length 9 hours 18 min. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



7 Isidor 

8 Erhard 

9 Julian 

10 Paul's imp 

11 Eugene 

12 Rinehold 

13 Hilary 



9 36 
10 28 



12 59 



3 55 

5 8 

6 20 
D sets 

5 59 

7 9 

8 14 



#•20 



4 5 Stf. 

$ gr. Hel. Lat. N. W 

C in per. D 6 $ 1? . 

10th. 9 rises 3 49. 
a Neptune O. 
6 J) % . $ stationary, 
o sets 6 38. 



194 
194 

184 
IT 4 



39 

39 
40 
41 
41 
42 
43 



2 2d Sunday after Epiphany. John 2. Bay's length 9 hours 26 min. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



14 Felix 

15 Maurice 

16 Marcellus 

17 Anthony 

18 Franklin b. 

19 Sarah 

20 F. Sebast. 



3 32 


9 15 


4&< 26 


4 16 


10 16 


$s& 8 


5 14 


11 14 


,,pff20 


6 10 


morn 


m 2 


1 


12 10 


P^14 


1 46 


1 15 


p^26 


8 34 


2 25 


« 8 



Regulus rises 1 30. 

<?jyO. 2/ south 11 50. 
Spica rises 12 58 
11th Orions. 9 53. 

Aldebarau south 8 26. 

(?n^O. 9 rises 4 2. 

O enters 4& . 



9 


1 16 


10 


1 16 


10 


7 15 


10 


1 15 


11 


7 14 


11 


1 13 


11 


7 12 



3 3d Sunday after Epiphany. Matt. 8. Days length 9 hours 38 min. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



21 Agnes 

22 Vincent 

23 Emerenth 

24 Timothy 

25 Paul's Con. 

26 Poly carpus 
21 J. Chrysost 



9 22 

10 12 

10 48 

11 34 
morn 

12 52 
1 44 



3 301 || 20 

4 34'HE 2 

5 38 

6 40 
Drise 

6 20 

1 29 



*1.5 



^23 
fr 8 



&. Rigel south 8 54. 

Din apo. Sir. s. 10 22 Pi 

£ rises 6 12 

|gp^ 5 gr. el. w. 6 D % . 

!J^25th. % sets 6 12. 

% south 11 10. 

9 rises 4 12. 



12 

12 

12 7 

12 

13 

13 

13 



4 
4 
4 
4 
74 



4 Septuagesim Sunday. Matthew 20. Day's length 9 hours 52 mm. 



s. 


28 Charles 


2 38 


8 35 


^22 


Spica rises 11 12. 


1317 


4 


4 56 


M. 


29 Valerius 


3 26 


9 48 


A 6 


6 $ k . Orion s. 8 58. 


137 




4 57 


T. 


30 Adelgunda 


4 15 


10 40 


^20 


Capella south 8 16. 


147 


2 


4 58 


W. 


31 Virgil 


5 5 


11 34 


MIS 4 


$in&. Arctur r. 10 4. 


14J7 


1 


4 59 



Moon's Phases. 

Last Quarter t the 3d, at 4 o'clock 40 m. in 
the evenir.^,. 

New Moon, the 10th, at 9 o'clock 45 m. in 
the forenoon. N 

First Q>. fir/ 7-, the 17th, at 6 o'clock 50 m. 
in the mor: upg. 

Full Mocn, the 25th, at 13 o'clock 2 m. in 
the afternoon. 



Conjecture of the^weather. 

1, 2, moderate : 3, 4, 5, variable ; 6, 7, 8, 
moderate, cloudy ; 9, snow ; 10, 11, rainy 
and icy ; 12, 13, 14, clear ; 15, cloudy ; 1G, 17, 
18, N. W., cold : 19, cloudy ; 20, 21, clear, 
cold; 22, 23, 24, cloudy with rain and snow ; 
25, 26, 27, cold ; 28, 29, moderate ; 30,'31, N. j 
W., cold. 



SECOND MONTH. 



FelDruary. 



29 DAYS 



p 

T. 
F. 

S. 



s. 

M. 
T. 

W. 
T. 

F. 



Moon Moon Moon's sun | Sun sun 

Remarkable South, r. & s. pi nooir Aspects of Planets, and other S IJ W , rises sets. 

r) aV6 . h. m.|h. ra|sigdeg.j miscellaneous matter. h. m. h. m 

1 Virginia 5 48- morn «<B£18 : /gf^ 9 rises 4 24. 14 [1 5. 

2 Candle Max, 6 36 12 44 |r 2^2nd. 2/ s. 10 40. 14 6 59 5 

3 Blasius 7 24= 1 40i !§r lo|tf- Orion south 8 40^ |14|6 58 5 



Se.ragesima Sunday. 
4 



Luke 8. Day' 8 length 10 Jwurs 6 mtn. 



2 

- 



Veronica 

Agra he 
Dorothy 
Richard 
Solomon 
Apolloma 
10 Scholastica 



8 301 2 4(5 4% % sets 6 2 

9 20 



10 8: 
10 48| 
ill 20 
12 18 
i 1 12 



j) ris 



w 14 6 5715 
49 ,a%14 Birius south 9 25. 14 6 56;5 

56 q%29 } 6 9 Sa. % rises 5 10 14 6 555 
59 A .12 j) in per. 6 } $ r. 6 0. il4 6 545 




37 8M 

6 Quinquagesima Sunday. Luke 18. 



8th. 2/ so. 10 16. 14 6 53 5 

9 rises 4 41. 15 6 52 5 

6~J %. 5 in Aphelion 15 6 51,5 

Day's length 10 hours 22 min. 



S. 11 Euphrosina ' 2 

M.|l2 Gilbert 2 

T. 13 Shrove Tue\ 3 

W. 14 Ash V/edn. \ 4 
T. 15 Fauetine 

F. 16 Jolfanus i 5 

S. 17 Constantine 6 



8 35! 



6 
46 9 32]j$I6 
34 10 20jf$*28 
3011 101^10 



4 Arctur rises 9 16. 
Ant ares rises 3 14. 
Spica rises 10 3. 



5 1511 58 P0jf2 
55J raornj $$ 
48 12 49 Jl 



[1516 49 5 11 | 
15 6 48 5 12 
15 6 47 5 13 



6 9 h 



11 south 9 42.;14:6 45 5 



\l rises 4 36. 
i|^S|16th. 9 r. 4 48. 
lfij^JJJProcyoii so. 9 28. 



14;6 445 
1416 



15 
16 
17 



43 5 

jl4|6 42|5 18 



let Sunday in Lent. 



Malt. 4. 



Day's length 10 hours 38 min. 



S. 18 Concordia 
M. 19 Susanna 
T. 20 Eucharius 
Emberday 



7 36 

8 22: 

9 16i 
10 11 



W. 21 

T. 22 WashingtonllO 58 

F. 23 Serenus ill 44 



461 JJ 28 '&• Orion so. 7 38 
40MglO j) in apo. Qen 



^.il4|6 415 19 I 

14I6 395 21 



32ls*$J22 
4 iM 5 



6 j)^ 

<5 )¥. Sir ins so 
s g$*19 ' Pollux south 9 32. 
59| &* 3;Spica rises 9 24. 



v south 9 28. |14 6 38 5 22 



B. 24 St. Matthew] mom:])^J % 17|9 rises 4 54 



1914 

114 

114 



23, 

25 



37:5 
3515 
345 26 
33 5 27 



8 2d Sunday in Lent. Matt. 15. Day's length 10 hours 58 min. 



B. 25 Victor 

M. (26 Nestor 

T. 27 Leander 

W. 28 Macarius 

T. 29 Leap Year 



12 40 

1 30 

2 14 

2 54 

3 46 



6 541 s& 1! Saturn rises 4 8. 



AM 

C|gl2 

11 20|«|£27 



7 5(3 

8 59 
10 11 



2/ south 9 4. 
Arctur rises 8 20. 
llegulus south 112. 
Aldebaran sets 12 38. 



13J6 31 

13 6 30 

1316 29 

13|6 27 

13 6 26 



5 29 ! 
5 30; 
5 31 j 
5 33 I 
5 34; 



Moon's Pfa.es. 

Ui&t Quarter, the 2d, at 5 o'clock m. in 
the morning. 

TSm Moon, the 8th, at 8 o'clock 38 min. 
in the evening. 

Jblr«t Quarter, the 10th, at 1 o'clock 10 m. 
in the morning. 

F.ulKocm, the 34tfc, at 5 o'clook 44 m. in 
the morning. 







Conjectures 


of the Weather. 






1 


, 2, coldest days 


; 3, 


4, cold ; 5 


0, 


mo.icr- 


ate 


; 7, 


snow ; 8, 9, 


10, 


cold ; 11, 1 





moder- 


ate 


13, 


14, 15, N. 


W 


, ; cold; 16, 


17 


, clear , 


18, 


cold 


; 19, snow or rain ; 20, 21 


, 22, cold 


23, 


24, 


variable ; 25, 


?now ; 26. 


27, 


28, N. ' 


W. 


cold ; 29, clear. 











THIRD MONTH. 



lUL^rolx. 



31 DAYS. 



Remarkable 
Days. 



Moon 

South, 
h. m. 



Moon I Moon's! 

r. <Ss a. pi noon Aspect of Planets, and otber 

h. m.lsig. desjl miscellaneous ma tter. 



Sun 

irises. I sets. 
m - h. m.!h. m 



sun | Sun 

slow 



1 David 

2 Simplicius 



4 441 mom 

5 40|l2 321 



fa 1 1 '0^ ? in&. 9 rises 4 50.113 6 25 5 3o 



9 3d Sunday in Lent. Luke 11 



3 Samuel 

4 Veronica 

5 Frederick 

6 Fridolin 

7 Perpetua 

8 Philemon 
Prudence 



2 gr.Hel.Latjip;12l 6 24,5 36 
Dixy'S length 11 hours 16 min. 

"6 371 1 £t|v£fe 6'iOrion South ~t 
7 34 



50. 



2 50 

8 28! 3 48 

9 26: 4 38 

10 181 5 20 

11 15| 5 59 

12 10H) se/s 



d&lSu? south 8 46. 
tf& 0| <5 1) \. prises 3 40 

12 h)mper. 6 D 9 . 9 r. 446(11 16 18;5 42 



w 126 225 38 
Il2 6 215 39 
12 6 20'5 40 



25 Spiea rises 8 40. 
1\,dS^ Sinus south 7 22. 



19 



9th. uH 



|lli6 17 5 43 
116 165 44 
116 145 46 




11 bih Sunday in Lent. John 8 

7 ~T8 : 1 2 " 8 4[|f^3j"^sou th~8~8 

i mm ~ 



s. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



17 St. Patrick 

18 Aushelmus 

19 Josephus 

20 Matron a 

21 Benedict 

22 Paulina 

23 Everard 




Day's length 11 hours 54 min 

~6 
5| D in apo. 6 j) 2/ . f\ 



««gSlT|4 3) $ i prises 2 55. 
$$* Oen.^f. Day & night eqj 
^13|Springcom. 9 in &. 
f^27jAldebaren sets 11 18. 
gu= ll|Venus rises 4 41. 



35 57 
2!5 58 
1!5 59 
0,6 
596 1 



7 5 5716 3 
7 5 5f>|6 4 



12 Palm Sunday. 



Matt. 21. Day's length 12 hours 12 min. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



24 Gabriel 

25 An.B.V. M. 

26 Emanuel 

27 Gustavus 

28 Maund Th. 

29 Good Frid. 

30 Guido 



morn 


J) ris. 


12 46 


7 56 


1 40 


8 44 


2 38 


9 40 


3 28 


10 36 


4 16 


11 44 


5 12 


morn 



%■ 25||f^24th. 6*%. 
£&2 £• ftjgjr $ in Perihelion. 
£^25j prises 2 34. 
^10 2/ south 7 28. 
qfg25jSpica rises 7 24. 

f9jSirius south 6 6. 
230rion sets 11 35. 



5 54|6 6 

5 53 6 7 

5 52 6 8 

5 50|6 10 

5 49 6 11 

5 486 12 

5 47 6 13 



13 Easter Sunday, 



MarkU. 



Day's length 12 hours 30 min. 



S. |31 Easter Sun.\ 6 2|12 48|^ 7|^fl^31. Ilig. s. 11 54.^| 4|5 45,6 15 



Moon's Phases. 

Last Quarter, the 2d, at 2 o'clock 10 m. in 
the afternoon. 

New Moon, the 9th, at 7 o'clock 41 m. in 
the morning. 

First Quarter, the 16th, at 9 o'clock 10 rn. 
in the morning. 

Last Quarter, the 31st, at 9 o'clock IS m. 
in the morning. 

Full Moon, the 24th, at 8 SO in the eve. 



Conjecture of the weather. 

1, 2, 3, cold ; 4, 5, moderate and cloudy ; 6 
7, rain ; 8, 9, 10, fair ; 11, 13, cloudy ; 13, 14, 
15, N. W.; 16, 17, variable ; 18, snow or rain; 
19,20, 21, clear, cold; 22,23, 24, rain ; 25, 
26, cold; 27, 28, stormy ; 39, 30, 31, fair. 



FOURTH MONTH. 



jaLrorii. 



30 DAYS. 



Remarkable 
Dajs. 



I Moon j Moon 
I Soulh.'r. <fc s. 
ih. m |h. m. 



jMoon'S] 

jpl noon Aspects of Planets,and other 

Jsig deg tniscellaneons matter. 



M. 

It. 

Iw. 

T. 

F 

S 



Easter Mon 

Theodosia 

Ferdinand 

Ambrose 

Maximus 

Egisippus 



8 28 

9 18 



3 28 

4 6 



& o 

^26 



D in per. 6 D \ r220.^ 
9 rises 4 34. 
3 stationary. 
Yen in Aph. £ gr. el. E 
Sgr.Hel. Lat.N. <5 D 
$ sets 7 20. 



unf Snn | Sun. 
rises, j sets, 
b. ro.h. m 



4|5 44 


6 16 


415 43 


6 IT 


35 41 


6 19 


3|5 40 


6 20 


3 5 39 


6 21 


2 5 37 


6 23 



14 1st Sunday after Easter. John 20. Day's length 12 hours 48 min. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



7 Aaron 

8 Celestinus 

9 Prochorus 

10 Daniel 

11 Julius 

12 Eustachius 

13 Justinus 



11 40 


D ris. 


fflf 8 


12 38 


7 30 


f#20j 


1 31 


8 28 


P$ 2 


2 22 


9 26 


P^14 


3 11 


10 10 


P$26 


3 44 


10 46 


W 8 


4 40 


11 42 


ff 20 



7th. Sirias s. 10 36 

(5}S .Orion s.ll 4 

6~J) $.k rises 1 58. 1 

alio. akO. i 1 

^sets 12 30. | 1 

Yenus rises 4 28. 10 

. 6 Neptune ©. | sjn 



2|5 36 6 24 
2 5 35 6 25 
5 33 6 27 
5 32;6 28 
5 31 6 29 
5 30 6 30 
5 29 6 31 



15 2d Sunday after Easter. John 10. Day's length 13 hour's 6 miinL 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



14 Tiburtius 

15 Olympia 

16 Calixtus 

17 Rudolph 
IS JSneas 

19 Anieetas 

20 Sulpitius 



8 14 

8 54 

9 46 
10 30 



34! morning 2 

HK26 



12 36 
1 22 



6 

48 
22 
54 



£ stationary, f^s 
15. Dinapo. 6 J) % 
CM?©. % sets 12 16. 
\ rises 1 25. 
$$*22Rigel sets 9 58. 
^ 5 6 $ o . Yen rises 4 21. 
g* 19|Oenters p^f. 



*«?t|6 27 


6 


0j5 26 


6 


015 25 


6 


15 24 


o 


15 23 


6 


1'5 21 


6 


15 20 


6 



33 
34 
35 

36 
37 
39 
40 



16 3d Sunday after Easier. John 16. Day's length 13 hours 22 min. 



S. 121 Adularius 

M. |22 Cajus 

T. |23 St. George 



W. 
T. 

F. 

S. 



24 Albertus 

25 S8l Mark, E 

26 Cletus 

27 Anastasius 



10| 4 21|^ 3|Siriussets 9 28. 

Aldebaran sets 9 24. 
23d. Orion s. 10 8. 
_?($.$ O. Inferior. 

1 36i 9 381 <§r 4i2/sets 11 59. 

2 37J10 48| M 19 1 . gr. Hel. Lat. S. 

3 39!11 54!^ 3JDin per. r. 4 16. W- 



11 

11 46j 4 55| ^ 18 
morn! J) sets j ^fg 3 

12 40| 8 22 yf£18 



15 19J6 41 

25 18'6 42 

215 17J6 43 

25 15 6 45, 



25 

2'5 

2i5 



14;6 46 

13:6 47 

12 6 48 



17 4:th Sunday after Easter. John 16. Day's length 13 hours 40 min. 



S. 

M. 

T. 



28 Vitalis 

29 Sybilla 

30 Eutropius 



4 40 

5 38 

6 34 



morn ^17| $ in . 6 J h . \ r. 12 47| 3j5 10J6 50 

12 51 $& 2j/gf^Autares r. 9 30. | 3 5 9|6 51 

1 37 JU5j\|^ 30th. ^stationary, j 35 8:6 52 



Conjecture of the weather. 



Moon's Phases. 

New Moon, the 7th, at 7 o'clock 20 m. in 

the evening. 1, 2, rain ; 3, 4, 5, clear ; G, 7, rainy, 

First Quarter, the 15th, at 5 o'clock ra. c]oudy . 8} Q; variable ; 10, stormy with 



showers ; 11, 12, 13, fair ; 14, 15, 10, varia- 
ble ; 17, 18, 19, clear; 20, cloudy; 21, 22, 



in the evening. 

Full moon, the 23d, at 8 o'clock 26 m. iu 
the morning. 

Last Quarter, the 30th, at 3 o'clock 8 m. in ««*n*e* showers ; 23, 24, 25, clear ; 20, 27, 
the morning. 38, pleasant, warm ; 29., 30, showers. 



FIFTH MONTH. 



3MC»,y. 



31 DAYS. 



W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



Kemarkabie 
Davs. 



j Moon 
iSouth. 
[n, m 



Moon Moon's 

'■ X 8. pi TiOOU 

h. m pig deg 



|Sunj Sua 

Aspects of Placets, and other, fast irises. 

miscellaneous matter. m ' |h. m. 



1 Philip Jas. 

2 Sigisiuuiid 

3 Inv. oj Or. 

4 FJorianus 



7 25 


2 20 


A 2- 


8 11 


2 52 


«io 


8 58 


3 22 


^23 


9 42 


3 46 


i%s$$ 5 



Venus rises 4 12. 
% in ■ . 11 sets 11 45. 
>irius sets 8 58. 
^•jica south 10 31. 



5 7 

5 6 

5 5 

5 4 



Sun 
sets. 
h. m. 



6 53 
6 54 
6 55 
6 56 



18 5th Sunday after Easter. JuhnlQ Day's length 13 hours 54 min. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



5 Godard 

6 A gge us 

j. Domicilla 

8 Stanislaus 

9 Ascens. D. 

10 Gordianus 

11 Mam ert us 



10 28 

11 18 

12 12 
1 4 

1 48 

2 30 

3 32 



4 11 
4 36 

D sets' 

7 56 

8 52 

9 48 
10 42 




369?. Y.rises 4 6. 
$ stationary. 
7th. 6 C $ . 
6 ~$Y. $in Aphelion, 
% rises 12 10. 

. Orion sets 8 54. 
Arctur south 10 55. ^ 



59 1 

7 



4 4 58 

4 4 57 



57 

58 

59 



1 



T 3 



19 Qth Sunday after Easter. John 15. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



12 Faiicratius 

13 Servatius 

14 Christian 

15 Sophia 

16 Pereg?inus 

17 Yeaantius 



18 Liber i u- 



5 48 

6 34 

7 26 

8 16 

9 10 



11 38 
morn 

12 20 
12 49 



Day's length 14 hours 8 min. 



Din ap. 6 D.2/S. 11 20. 
(5])|. Venus rises 4 

Libras so. 11 38. 

15th. %v. 11 48. 
Altair rises 9 26. 
^SO. Spicas. 9 27. 



^23 
^jp 5 

^f*17 

& 

1=13 

gu= 27|Antares rises 8 16. 



56 
55 
54 
53 
52 
51 
50 



4 
5 

6 
7 
8 
9 
10 



20 Whitsunday or Pentecost. John 14. Day's length 14 hours 22 min. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



Whit Sund. 
Whit Mond. 
Rrudebe'e 
E31BERDAY 
Desica-sius 

24 Johanoa 

25 Urban u~ 



19 
20 
21 

22 
23 



9 46 

10 38 

11 30 
morn 

12 26 

1 18 

2 20 



2 52 

3 20 
3 51 

J> ris. 

8 25 

9 36 
10 40 




prises 11 38. 
2/ sets 11 6. 
g^Onters J«J . 
(|H?22d. $gr. el. 



west. 
MTA. N. $ rises 4 18. 
D in per. Yen. r. 3 58.^ 
Regulas sets 12 34. 



4 
4 
4 
4 


4 49 
4 48 
4 48 

4 47 


7 11; 

7 12; 
7 12; | 
7 13 


4 
3 
3 


4 46 
4 46 
4 45 


7 14 j 
7 14 i 
7 15! 



21 Trinity Sunday. 



John 3. 



Day's length 14 hours 32 min. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 



Beda 

Lucimi 

William 

Maxia Han 
Corp. Ohri. 
Manilim 



3 25 


11 33 


4 26 


morn 


5 18 


12 20 


6 10 


12 55 


7 6 


1 26 


7 46 


1 52 



vft£26j6 } h. prises 11 4. 

tlOi % sets 10 44. 
24! Arctur south 9 48. 
5R 71/^29. $gr.Hel.Lat.S. 
3?< 20|V^Spica south 8 47. 
ijflfF 2|Pollux sets 10 52. 



34 44 

34 

3!4 

34 



43 
43 
42 
41 
34 41 



3,4 



16; 

17; 
Ail 

18! 



Moon's Phases. 

New Mooo, tlv 7th, at eight o'clock 6 m. 
in the morning. 

First Quarter, t1«,- 15th, at 10 o'clock 52 m. 
in the forenoon 



Conjecture of the weather. 

1, 2, 3, fair ; 4, 5, variable ; 6, 7, rain ; 8, 9, 
10, 11, fair; 12, thunder ; 13, 14, 15, clear; 
16, 17, 18, warm, sultry ; 19f 20, 21, rain ; 22, 



Full Moon. U. 221, at 5 o'clock 56 m. in thmdw . ^ ^ ^ pleasant> warm . a6> 37 ; 
the evening. 

Last Quarter, th, 29,h, at 9 o'clock in the cloudy ; 28, 29, variable ; 30, 31, thunder 



morning. 



showers. 



33E 



SIXTH MONTH. 



JTUJOLO, 



30 DAYS. 



Remarkable 
Days. 



Moon 

South, 
fi. m. 



Moon I Moon's 
r. & s.iplnoon 
h. m.lsia: dee: 



Aspects of Planets, and other 
miscellaneous matter. 



Sun 
fast 



(Sun 
ir ises. 



Sun 

sets. 



h. m.'h. m. 



S. I 1 Nicodemus 



29! 2 19|«fl4| prises 10 42. 



| 2|4 40|7 28 



I 22 1st Sunday after Trinity. Luke 16. Day- s length 14 hours 40 min 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



2 Marcellus 

3 Erasmus 
Darius 
Bonifacius 
Artenius 
Robertus 
Medardus 



9 14 


2 44 


^^26 


10 12 


3 14 


P0* 8 


10 46 


3 50 


p^20 


11 40 


D sets 


ff 2 


12 38 


8 40 


If 13 


1 33 


9 8 


f| 25 


2 25 9 44 


HK 7 



Librae south 10 2. 

^sets 10 26. 

J 6 % r. 3 58 

5th. (5)S. 6 % j$ 
Antares s. 11 24. 

Wega south 1 32 ^ 

\ rises 10 2. 



401? 
39j7 
391*1 

38,7 

387 
37j7 
377 



20 
21 
21 

22 
22 
23 
23 



J3 2d Sunday after Trinity. Luke 14. Day's length 14 hours 46 min. 



S. 

at. 

T. 

w. 

T. 
F. 

s. 



9 Barnimus 
10 Flavins 
li Barnabas 

12 Basilides 

13 Tobias 

14 Heliseus 

15 Vitus 



10 16 


HB19 


10 40 


$$ft.-2 


11 18 


«rW 


11 51 


®#27 


morn 


ft 10 


12 24 


g?23 


12 56 


A 1 



D in apo. 3 6 # ^ . 

2/ sets 10 6. 

Regulus sets 11 14. 

Spica south 7 54. 

Altair south 12 18. 
Uth.Yenus.r. 3 
Arctur s. 8 36. 



57. ~ 



1 


t 37 


1 


4 36 





4 36 





4 36 


sun 


4 34 




4 35 


* 4 35 



23 

24 
24 
24 
25 
25 
25 



24 3d Sunday after Trinity. Luke 15. Day's length 14 hours 50 min. 



K 

M. 

T. 
W 
T. 
F. 

S. 



16 Rolandus 

17 Nicander 

18 Arnolphus 

19 Gervasius 

20 Sylverius 

21 Raphael 

22 Achatius 



8 18! 1 22 



9 8 

9 58 

[10 56 

111 52 
I morn 



12 54 



1 51 

2 19 

2 55 

3 38 
D ris. 

9 16 



Of£ 5 



^•20 
Jfe 5 



h rises 9 30. 0!4 35 

6 %. $iu . 6 $ %. 1;4 35 

6 M. S. Libra? s. 9 24. 14 35 

% sets 9 40. 1|4 35 

Oensnfg. Long Day. 1.4 35 

^^21 j) in p. Sum. cWl 14 35 

in uD 2;4 35 



25 
25 
25 
25 
26 
25 
1 65 



85 hth Sunday after Trinity. Luke 6. Day's length 14 hours 48 min. 



37 

M. 
T. 
W 

T. 
F. 

S. 



23 Agrippina 

24 John, Bap 

25 Elogius 
56 Jeremiah 
27 "7 Sleepers 
.28 Leo. 

29 Peter, Paul 



1 59 


10 4 


$& 4 


3 5 


10 42 


J> 18 


4 4 


11 16 


«3* o 


5 


11 48 




5 42 


morn 


^28 


6 26 


12 14 


fljij^ll 


7 12 


12 42 


^p23 



rises 9 12. 

6 £ O- Superior. 

Procyon sets 7 36. 

Regulus sets 10 20. 

27th. Wega. s. 12 9 
Antares s. 9 51. 

Spica sets 12 11. 



2 


4 35 


2 


4 35 


2 


4 35 


3 


4 35 


3 


4 35 


3 


4 35 


3 


4 36 



26 bth Sunday after Trinity. Luke 5. Day's length 14 hours 50 win. 



S. J30 Pauli mem.| 7 56| 7 26|^R 5|^t sets 9 78. 



3!4 36 7 24 



Moon'8 phases. 

New Moon, the 5th, at 10 o'clock 10 m- in 
the evening. 

First'Quarter, the 14th, at 2 o'clock 10 m. 
va. the morning. 

Full Moon, the 2l6t, at 1 o'clock 46 m. in 
the morning. 

Last Quarter, the 27th, at 4 o'clock, 45 m. 
In the afternoon. 



Conjecture ot the weather. 
1, 2, 3, clear ; 4, 5, cloud)' ; 6, 7, thunder 
showers; 8, 9, 10, clear ; 11, 12, cloudy ; 13, 
14, 15, warm; 16, thunder ; 17, 18, vaiiable; 
19, 20, 21, fair ; 22, 23, warm ; 24, 25, thun- 
der showers ; 26, 27, 28, clear ; 29, 30, fair, 
with showers. 



SEVENTH MONTH. 



iTuLiy*. 



M. 
T. 

W, 
T. 
F. 

S. 



Remarkable 
Days. 

1 Theobald 

2 Visit V. M 

3 ' ornelius 

4 Mil of July 

5 Demetrius 

6 John Huss 



■ M'.on | Moon Moon's 

South, r. & p.jpl noon Aspects of Placets, ana other, 5 ™ , il 

h m.h msigdeg. miscellaneous matter. I • )h. ir » 



31 DAYS. \i 

-^ i | 

sunj San"! suri | J 
stow r i 8es Uete. !| 



8 30 

9 18 
10 10 

10 58 

11 56 

12 48 




>2 rises 8 40. 

^gr.Hel.Lat.N. O'm&p. 

Q t Yfegdt south 11 45. 

6 J % .% rises 3 52. 
5th. 6 D 9 . fM 
3) in apo. 3) 6 $ $ 



4!4 36J7 24 

4|4 367 241- 

4 4 37;7 23 I 

4 4 37J7 231 

4 4 38 7 22 ! 

4 4 38 7 22 



27 6tfi SurcJa?/ after Trinity. Matt. 5. Dafs length U hoursjA nun 

_ " " ~5 



M 

T. 
W 
T 

F. 

S. 



7 Edelburga 

8 Aquila 

9 Zeno 

10 J". Calvin b 

11 Puis 

12 Henry 

13 Margaret 



1 34 

2 22 

3 16 

3 56 

4 44 

5 32 

6 26 




4 q % . 6 $ 1 

3/ sets 8 50. 

8 h O-^^^h 12 4 

4^2/. Spica s. 11 S3. 

1* rises 12 49. 

Antares s. 8 54, 
13th Sirius r. 4 8. 



4 38i7 22, | 
4 39 7 21 



4 39 

4 40 
4 40 



7 21 
7 20 
7 20 



4 41 7 19 
4 41 7 19 



28 1th Sunday after Trinity. Mark 8. Bay's length 14 hours 3»* mw. 



14 Bonavent | 7 16 

15 Apostle's d.\ 8 8 

16 Hilary 



S 

M. 

T. 

W. 17 Alexius 



T. 

R 

S. 



18 Maternus 

19 Ruffina 

20 Elijah 



8 58 
i 9 44 
jlO 38 
11 32 
! morn 




^sets 8 26. 
Dog Days begin. 
6 9 O- Superioi 
ff. S riles 3 35. 
D Neptune C 
3inper6 }) >j .^ 8.1124 
1^20. Spieas. 10 44. 



W 



6 

6 

f 6 

6 
6 

6 
6 



4 42|7 18 
4 43 7 17 
4 43 7 17 



4 -U 

4 45 
4 46 

4 47 



7 16 
7 15 
7 14 
7 13 



39 Mh Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 1. Bay's length U hours 24 wnVi. 

7 12 



S. 21 Praxedes 

M. 22 Mary Mag 

T. 23 Apolinaris 

W.J24 Christiana 

T. [25 St. James 

F. 126 St. Anne 

S. iz7 Martha 



12 34 1 8 34 

1 32 9 12 

2 28l 9 44 
; 3 18 10 10 
I 4 12J10 38 
; 5 6 11 1 

6 111 28 




Regulus sets 8 44 
6 HO enters $$*. 
Altair south 11 32 
6 Jf O. % rises 3 20. 
5_in £3 .9 in Perihel. 
^sets 7 58. 
" 27th. b s 10t8. 



6 


4 48 


6 


4 48 


6 


4 49 


6 


4 50 


G 


4 51 


6 


4 52 


6 


4 52 



7 12 

1 10 ! 
7 9] 

7 8-1 
7 8'* 



30 



c Mh Sunday after Trinity. Luke 16, Day's length 14 freurs 14 min. 



S. |28 Pantaleon 
M. |29 Beatrix 
T. |30 Upton 
W.I31 Germ anus 



6 46 

7 30 

8 14 



11 54 
morn 

12 22 



8 59 12 56 




4 9 2/. Orion r. 2 52. 
Wega south 9 59. 
Pollux sets 8 3. 
Q. Aldebaran t. 12 43 



4 53J7 7 

4 5417 6] 

4 55 7 5 If 

6 4 5H7 4 



Moon'? Phases. Conjectures of tte Weather. 

New Moon, the 5th, at 1 o'clock 12 m- in 1, 2, f a <r ; 3, shower* . 4, 5, clear ; 6, 7, f 

the afternoon. rai g 9 10 ^ _ , 3 g 

First Quarter, the 13th, at 2 o'clock 36 m J 

in the afternoon. est days; 14, 15, thunder shewore ; ia, 17, 

Full Moon, the 20th, at 8 o'clock 42 m. in ^ warm . ^ clondy . ^ ^ yirt|lWe . ^ 
the morning. 

Last Quarter, the 27th, at 2 o'clock, 6 m. 23, rain ; 24, 25, 26, warm ! fift, thunder 

in the morning. showers ; 28, 29,elcar ; SO, 31, fair. 



10 



I EIGHTH MONTH. 



-A.-O.S^S.JSt. 



31 DAYS. 



Remarkable 
Days. 



Moon 
South, 
h. m. 



MOOU [Moon'sj |Sun 

r. & s.jpl noon Aspects of Planets, and other| fast 
h. m.jsig degl miscellaneous matter. | m- 



Sun | Sun 
rises.] sets, 
h. m.h. m. 



J. 
F. 

•S. 



1 Lammas d. 

2 Stephen 

3 Augustus 



9 40 

10 36 

11 25 



1 39 HK 2 

2 29 HK13 

3 25 HE^5 



% rises 3 1. ^ 

D in apo. 6 J) % .$ gr. el. 



64 
6 

6 



57 
4 58 
4 59 



7 3 
7 2 
7 1 



31 10th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 19. Day's length 14 Zioars 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



Dominick 

Oswald 

An. of Chr. 

Godfrey 

Emily 

Ericus 



10 St. Lawr. 



12 16 


J> sets 


«# 8 


12 56 


8 10 


<g#20 


1 44 


8 42 


H : 3 


2 30 


9 14 


§v- : 11 


8 14 


9 44 


A o 


3 49 


10 16 


WW 


4 40 


10 46 


S^28 



.4th. 56^9. 
_ *7* rises 11 6. 
6 3) $ . ^ south 10 13. 
Antares south 7 10. 
Altair south 10 34. 
Sirius rises 4 18. 
Fomal south 1 29. 



6j5 

6;5 

65 
5|5 
55 
5!5 
5|5 



0|7 

16 
26 
36 
4 

6 

1 




59 
58 
51 
56 
54 
53 



32 11th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 18. Day's length 13 hours 44 m. 



S. 
M. 
T. 
W. 
T. 
! F. 
,S. 



11 Titus 

12 Clara 
Hildebert 
Eusebia 
Asc. V. M. 
Rochus 
Bertram 



13 

14 
15 
16 

IT 



5 28 


11 22 


*12 


6 24 


morn 


«26 


1 25 


12 18 


<$rl0 


8 26 


1 16 


^•25 


9 30 


2 10 


m& 


10 44 


2 41 


*m& 


11 48 


3 18 


A * 



Wega so. 9 8. 

12th. Sr. 2 41. 
15 . Orion rises 1 49. 
Rigel rises 2 05. ^ 
6 D I2 . h south 9 44. 
$ gr. Hel. Lat. K 
D in oer. Sirius r. 3 51. 



515 
55 
55 
4,5 
415 
4J5 
4;5 



816 52 

916 51 

106 50 

11 6 49 

126 
146 



156 



48 
46 
45 



33 l%tK Sunday after Trinity. Mark 1. Day's length 13 hours 28 m. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

■W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



18 Agapetus 

19 Sebaldus 

20 Bernard 

21 Rebecca 

22 Philibert. 

23 Zaccheus 

24 St.Barthol. 



morn 


D ris. 


<*21 


12 36 


1 45 




1 28 


8 11 


^<18 


2 26 


8 40 


*F 2 ' 


3 24 


9 6 


«P** 


4 19 


9 34 


pjf$? 


5 10 


10 


» 9 



,18th. 7* r. 10 22. 
Aldebaran r. 11 37. 
rises 2 36. 
Regulus rises 1 35. 
h south 9 21. 
6 H.U #.Oen. ^ 
Capella rises 1 5. 



3|5 
2J5 



44 
43 

42 
41 
40 
39 

37 



34 ldth Sunday after Trinity. Luke 10. Day's length 13 hours 12 m, 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 



25 Ludovicus 

26 Samuel 

27 Gephard 

28 St. August 

29 St.Johnbeh 

30 Benjamin 



S. 31 Paulina 



5 52 

6 40 

7 29 

8 10 

8 56 

9 26 
10 12 



10 33 p^21j/gp25. $gr. Hel. Lat.s.j 

11 . 6 fj 3!\j^Dog Days end. 

11 39 fjH5|&. Altair south 9 20. 
morn f| 27| prises 2 59. f^\ 

12 29 4g 9i h south 8 58. 

1 3sUJg21 Din apo. 6 $ ©.Inferior. 

2 46|$$ 3 D 6 % ^.Srises 2 24. 



1 2|5 24 


2^5 25 


I 1|5 27 


l!5 28 


1 


5 29 





5 30 





5 31 



36 
35 
33 
32 
31 
30 
29 



Moon's rhases. 
New Moon, the 4th, at 4 o'clock 34 m. in 



Conjecture of the weather. 
1, 2, cloudy, rainy ; 3, 4, 5, clear, warm ; 6, 
7, 8, variable ; 9, 10, 11, warm with thunder; 



• the morning. 

First Quart*,;, the 12th, at U o'clock 40 ^ tf ^ 

j m. in the morning. 

Full moon, the 18th, at 3 o'clock 41 m. in thunder showers; 20, 21, fair ; 22, cloudy; 

I the afternoon. ' ' ' ? o ?A showers ; 25, 26, 27, clear ; 28, 29, 

Last Quarter, the 25th, at 3 o'clock 22 m. 
! ia the afternoon. raiQ 5 30 > 81", variable. 



11 



NINTH MONTH. 



SeptemlDer. 



30 DAYS. 



Remarkable 
Days. 



Moon 
South, 
h. m. 



Moon I Moon's 
r. & s. pi noon 
h. m.lsig. deg 



Aspect of Planets, and other 
miscellaneous matter. 



Sun 
rises. 
h. m. 



Bun 



35 14th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 17. Day's length 12 hours 54 m. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



1 Egidius 

2 Eliza 

3 Mansuetus 

4 Moses 

5 Nathaniel 

6 Magnus 

7 Regina 



10 48 


3 59 


^$16 


11 46 


D sets 


$#29 


12 40 


7 26 


&13 


1 28 


7 56 


§=27 


2 1\ 


8 24 


An 


2 58 


8 56 


A 25 


3 44 


9 30 


* 9 



h south 8 42 
2d. 6 J) $ . 

659.9 sets 7 24. 

$ rises 2 14. 

prises 2 27. 

Spica sets 7 51. 

Sirius rises 2 34. 



33 
34 
35 

36 

3T6 
396 
406 



36 15th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 6. Day's length 12 hours 38 m. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



8 ffl of V. M. 

9 Bruno 

10 Pulcheria 

11 Protus 

12 J. WicJcliffe 

13 Amatus 

14 El. H. Crs. 



4 38 


10 12 *$g23 


5 26 


11 8 


#* 7 


6 12 


morn 


$r21 


7 8 


12 6 


431 5 


8 6 


12 46 


^19 


9 2 


1 32 


d 3 


9 42 


2 24 


4" 



$ stationary. 7*r* 8 59. 

£$. ? sets 7 12. 

10th. % rises 2 4. 
Aldebaran r. 10 14. ^ 
6 D 12.12 south 8 11. 
£in &. i rises 1 55. 
Din per. Fomal s. 11 20 



3 


5 41 


3 


5 43 


3 


5 44 


4 


5 45 


4 


5 47 


4 


5 48 


5 


5 49 



6 19 
6 17 
6 16 
6 15 
6 13 
6 12 
6 11 



37 lQth Sunday after Trinity. Luke 7. Day's length 12 hours 20 min. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 



15 Nicetas 

16 Euphemia 

17 Lampertus 

18 Emberday 

19 Micleta 

20 Jonas 

21 St. MattJiew 



10 38 


3 29 




11 26 


4 39 


36 w 


morn 


D ris. 


^27 


12 22 


7 20 


fg^lO 


1 24 


7 46 


^351^22 


2 28 


8 10 


p^ 5 


3 31 


8 39 


P$n 



£ gr. Elong. West. 

£ rises 5 10. 

Jp|17. Orion r. 11 

tjr7 I2 stationary. 

9 sets 6 59. 

i rises 1 49. 

6 % % . 12 south 7 33 



12. 



5 


5 50 


5 


5 52 


6 


5 53 


6 


5 54 


6 


5 56 


7 


5 57 


7 


5 58 



6 10 
6 8 



38 Vlth Sunday after Trinity. Luke 14. Day's length 12 hours drain 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



22 Maurice 

23 Hosea 

24 St. John's c. 

25 Cleophas 

26 Justina 

27 Cosmus 

28 Wenceslaus 



4 26 

5 20 


9 9 
9 44 


g$29 

ff 11 


6 16 


10 25 


f| 23 


7 12 

8 4 

8 48 

9 36 


11 14 
morn 

12 9 
1 6 


43 5 



Qen. fa .Day&night eq. 
Autumn com. Q, 
24. Antares s. 8 37. 

Sirius rises 1 24. {fa 

D in apo. 9 sets 6 49. 

6 J) #. prises 1 19. 

$ gr.Hel.Lat.N. 3 6 %. 



6 7|5 



39 \%th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 20. Day's length 11 hours 42 m. 



S. 
M. 



29 £$. Michael 

30 Jerome. 



10 20 

11 



2 11 

3 19 



^24 



o rises 1 39. 
Andromeda so. 11 33. 



106 
106 



5 51 
5 50 



Moon's Phases. 

New Moon, the 2d, at 7 o'clock 41 m. in' 
in the evening. 



Conjecture oi the weather. 
1, 2, 3, fair, warm ; 4, 5, thunder showers ; 



First Quarter, the 10th, at 8 o'clock 52 m. 6, 7, 8, clear ; 9, 10, variable ; 11, 12, 13, 



in the morning. 



rain ; 14, 15, 16, clear ; 17, 18, thunder 



Full Moon, the 17th, at 12 o'clock m. in 

the morniug, showeas ; 19, 20, 21, fair ; 22, variable ; 23, 

Last Quarter, the 21th, at 8 o'clock 10 m. S4 > rain 5 S5 > 26, 27, clear ; 28, fair ; 29, 30, 

in the morning. variable. 



TENTH MOMTH. 



Octotoer. 



81 DAYS. 



ja 
p 
f: 

W. 2 G. Columb 

T. I 3 Jairus 

F. 4 Francis 

S. 5 PlacidSs 



j Moon j Moon Moon'sl iwtml 

South. ;r. & s.pl noon Aspects of Planets, and otherj last 



Sun j Sun 
Remarkable [South. !r. & s.'plnoonjAspects of Planets, and otherj tast Irises.! sets. 
Days. |h. m.|h. m.jsig deg| miscellaneous matter. j m '|h. m.| h. m. 

1 R«mMiu¥"""ir3i~T34i &■ ^r5~5".^eotelTiO~ 
T>sets\ ^ 5iifli&2d. %v. 12 59 



11 34 

12 G 

12 56 



6 4Ci ^ 20>^p?Altair south 7 9. 

1 4li 7 lei^g 5J 6 ]) 9 . 9 sets 6 40. 

2 341 7 50:<-jg20!Siriusrise8l2 52. 



10,6 115 49' 
5 & 



11 6 13 

11 6 14 
11 6 15 

|l2|6 IT 



5 46 
5 45 
5 43 



40. UUh Sunday after Trinity. Malt. 9. Day's length 11 hours 24 m. 
STfl" Fides" 



M. ! 7 Amelia 

T. I 8 Pelagius 

W. 9 Dionysius 

T. 10 Gereon 

F. 11 Burkhart 

S. |12 Veritas 



3 30! 8 31!<gr 3; % rises 1 30 



4 28! 9 18 fH.8jD k O. c5- 

5 29;10 16,^ 2 Andromeda s. 116. & 

6 861 1 14.^1^9. 6 k D.12P.10 58 

7 261 mom | «$& 0'^W prises 12 4$. 



8 1912 16; 

9 11! 1 24 



14;7* rises 7 5. 



13 



27|Dinper.Regulusr.l0 26|l4 



6 1815 42 
6 195 41 
6 20 5 40 
6 22 ! 5 38 
& 235 37 
6" 24'5 36* 
& 26J5 34 



41 20tfi Sunday after Trinity. 
STTl 3 ^Coloman I YJqY 



Malt. 22. J9a?/'s length 11 fcp^ra 6 m. 

riiTyo 



9 4-9 1 2 32j g; 11| 6 $ O- Superior. 

M.I14 Fortuna 110 42j 3 41! ^23! 9 sets 6 32. 

T. |15 Hedwick 111 39 4 48!^ GjOriori vises 9 57. 

W.16 Gallus | morn|D ris.'^19'^^16th 2/r. 12 30 

T. :17 Florentine |12 19| 6 20,p^ 2 §<gj 8 Neptune O- 

F. Il8 St.Lv.keEh'2 59i 6 48ip$14|£ rises 1 21. 

S. [19 Ptolomy | .1. .44 1 7 16;g^26|^ets 10 18. 

John 4 



H 
14 

14 

!l5 
115 

|15 



6 27|5 |33 

6 28 5 ;32 

6 29:5 j&l 

6 3115 129 

6* 32j5 m 

6 33:5 J27 

6 35J5 25 



42 %lst Sunday after Trinity. 
2 24 



S. |20 Felicianus 
M. |21 Ursulla 
T. 122 Cordula 
W.J23 Severinu3 
T. |24 Salome 
F. 1 25 Crispin 
S. 126 Amandus 



Day's length 10 hours 48 m 

7 56 f$ 8|Altair south 6 4. 

8 28; H 19'Sirius rises 11 52. 

9 -Hhv4B 1 5 sets 29. m 



3 18 

4 16 

5 15 10 8;^gl3 

6 12J11 G>fp5 

7 6 morn'f^ 7 
7 56 12 2/^20 



©enters yg*. 
/®^24. D in apo. 6 D $ Il 
V^,7* rises 6 10. il 

6 % %. prises 12 12 



15 
15 
15 
16 

6 

1*8 

!16 



6 36 
6 37 
6 39 



5 24 
5 23 
5 21 



6 40'5 20 

6 41 5 19 

6 42 ! 5 18 

6 44 5 16 



Matt. 18. Day's length 1$ hours 30 m. 



43 22^ Sunday after Trinity. 

"^rSabioa \~~S~~U\'T " 4[^2\6~Yl\% risesTT^ 

28 Simon Jud.\ 9 26J 2 10 % IGj D ¥ O- ] 2 sets 9 35. 

29 H. ZwinglAlO 12i 



30 Serapion 

31 Hall. Eve. 



19 jfe 0i Orion rises 9 8. 



10 54 

11 42 



4 28 JSj HAndromeda so. 9 5 k 

5 41 p^ 281 ^ in Aphelion. 



116 
116 

J16 
16 
16 



4515 15 

46J5 14 

47 5 13 

48;5 12 

5015 10 



Moon's Phases. 

New Moon, the 2d, at 10 o'clock 22 m in 
the forenoon. 

First Quarter, the 0th, at 4 o'clock m. 
in the afternoon. 

Full Moon, the H>th, at 10 o'clock 2G m. 
in the foenoon. 

, Last Quarter, the 24th, at 3 o'clock 45 m. 
|ii the morniug. 



Orrije-cturecrf the vveath&r. 

1, 2, clear; 3, 4,5, variable ; 0, 7, rain ; 8, 
0, 10, fair ; 11, 12, 13, clear ; 14, 15, cloudy ; 
16, 17, rain ; 18, 19, 20, fair ; 21, 23, 23, N. 
W. wind ; 24, 25, variable ; 26, 27, 28, clear ; 
20, 30, cloudy ; 31, rain. 



13 



ELEVENTH MONTH. 



Novemto o^ . 



30 DAYS 



Remarkable 
1 All Saints 



Moon 
South, 
h. m 



Moon I Moon's 
r. & s. pi noon 
h. ra.lsig deg 



S. | 2 All Souls 



12 26|3)sete|HBE 13 
1 20J 6 22|«|£28 



~"~ j sun f gnu 

Aspects of Planets, and oth©r | fast rises. 
miscellaneous matter. j m In. m. 



oun 
sets. 
h. ra 



1st. 9 sets 6 34. |16|6 5115 9 
OSf.^r. 1144. jl6:6 52|5 8 



44 23d Sunday after Trinity. Matt 22. Day's length 10 hours 14m. 



SI 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



3 Theophilus 

4 Charlotte 

5 Malachi 
G Leonard 

1 Engelbert 

8 Cecilia 

9 Theodore 



2 21 

3 22 

4 24 

5 22 

6 21 



7 



7 5 
% 59 
9 2 

10 14 

11 24 
mom 

12 29 



166 55 



$eW\6 D 9, £gr.Hel.Lat.N.|16:6 53 5 
Jr 28iSirius rises 10 58. ^J16J6 54 " 
idfcWS D k.h&ete 9 0. 
.^26 D in per. Orion r. 8 36. 

tlO /- ^7th. % rises 1 2. 
24 ^Jj/Rigel rises 8 41. 
^ 1 7* south 12 42. 



6 56 
6 57 
6 58 
6 59 



45 24$, Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 8. Bay's, length 9 hours 58 ro, 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



10 Mart. Luth. 

11 Mart., B. 

12 Jonas 

13 Winebert 

14 Levin 

15 Leopold 

16 Ottomarus 



8 44 

9 34 
10 16 

10 58 

11 40 
mom 

12 26! 



1 34 

2 40 

3 42 

4 44 

5 48 
J> ris. 

5 54 



$# 3 

f*^16 
,f#28 



# stationary. 
9 sets 6 42. 
% rises 11 18. 
Altair sets 110. 
4flk h sets 8 32. 
*'%$15. O eclipsed, vis. 



<JwJ 4 o rises 12 53. 



1617 

16jt 
1617 

15J7 
157 
157 
15 7 



1J4 

2l4 



74 



59 
58 
57 
56 
55 
54 
53 



46 25$, Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 24. Day's leng'h 9 hours 44 m. 



S. !17 Alpheus 
M-. |18 Gelasius 



T. 
W. 

F. 

47 



19 Elizabeth 
M Amos 

21 Off. V. M. 

22 Alphonsus 

23 Clement 



29 
9 
5Q 
53 
40 
42 
52 



16iAldebarao rises 6 2. 
27!Sirius rises 10 2 



115.7 
^15.7 

s^ 9: 9 sets 6 50. I147 

i4^2l\6 J) ¥. prises 10 46. J14.7 
$j* 3| Din apo. $ gr.Hel.Lat. 8-14 7 
$g*15|/gr^ nllO.6 DO^. 1:4:7 
©3*28 V±^ 23d Sat. sets 8 4. 1137 



84 

94 

10J4 

lljl 

iik 

124 
13]4 



02 
51 

50 
49 
49 

48 

47 



26$ Sunday after Trinity. Malt, 25. Day's length 9 hours 32 m. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



24 Chrisogene 

25 Catharine 

26 Conrad 

27 Jehosaphat 

28 G anther us 

29 Saturn 

30 St. Andrew 



6 50 


morn §? 11 


7 38 


12 54 


& -24 


8 22 


2 1 


A * 


9 10 


3 9 


A 21 


9 59 


4 24 


MK 6 


10 57 


5 39 


HR21 


11 56 


3 sets 


#* 6 



7* south 11 39. 
6* w $ .% rises 12 44. 
Orion rises 7 10. 
$ gr. Elong. East. 
$j>ets 5 52 

Arctur rises 2 36. 
30. Arietis s. 9 34 



13j7 

137 
127 
12|f 
12J7 
117 
117 



164 



46 
45 
45 
44 
43 
43 
42 



Moon's Phases. 

Conjecture of the weather. 
New Moon, the 1st, at 12 o'clock 20 m. in 

the morning. 1, 2, rain ; 3, 4,5, clear ; 6, 7, 8, variable ; 

First Quarter, the 7th, at 10 o'clock 4o m. 

in the evening. 9 > 10 > fair 5 H> 12 , 13, 14, Indian summer ; 15, 

Full Moon, the 15th, at 12 o'clock in the ^ variable . 17j 18j rain or snow . 19j 20, 

morning. 

Last quarter, the 23d, at 12 o'clock 36 m. 21, clear, cold ; 22, 23, 24, moderate ; 25, 26, 

in the morning. cloudy; 27, 58, 29, vaiiable; 30, rain and 

New Moon, the 30th, at 1 o'clock 28 m.in 



the afternoon. 



snow. 



14 



TWELFTH MONTH. 



Decemtoer. 



31 DAYS. 



Remarkable 
Days. 



| Moon j Moon 
i South, j r. & s. 
In. m.!h. m. 



Moon's 
pi noon 
sig deg 



Aspects of Planets, and other 
miscellaneous matter. 



Sun I Sun 
rises, sets. 
h. mJh. m 



48 1st Sunday in Advent. Matt. 21. Day's length 9 hours 22 min. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W. 

T. 

F. 

S. 



Longinus 

Candidus 

Cassianus 

Barbara 

Abigail 



6 St. Nichol. 

7 Agathon 



12 56 


5 35 


#•21 


1 59 


6 39 


m e 


2 46 


7 49 


*S21 


3 38 


9 1 


fijk 6 


4 26 


10 12 


A 20 


5 20 


11 24 




6 14 


morn 





Venus sets 7 0. 
6 D $ . }Z r. 10 26. © 
Din per. } 6 Y. S. 
6 Y. S. S. sets 7 30. 
$ rises 12 36. 

% stationary. 

7tb. $ gr.'Hel.Lat.S. 



10 


7 19 


10 


7 19 


10 


7 20 


9 


7 20 


9 


7 21 


9 


1 21 


8 


7 22 



41 
41 

40 
40 
39 
39 

38 



49 2d Sunday in Advent. Luke 21. Day's length 9 hours 16 mm. 



S. 
M. 
T. 



8 C. V. Uary\ 7 4 

9 Joachim 
10 Judith 



W.jll Barsabas 

T. 12 Ctilia 

F. 13 Lucian 

S. 14 Nicasius 



7 44 

8 43 

9 42 

10 41 

11 39 
morn 



12 32j^f 
40j^5^13 
5l!$^25 

10|M19 

24 M 2 



D ris. I 



13 



% in Aphelion. 
7* south 10 35. 
Yenus sets T 21. 
Markab sets 12 32. 
X rises 10 8. 
% r. 12 28. 
?14th. S. s. 6 



55. 



38 
37 
37 
37 
36 



4 36 
4 34 



50 3d Sunday in Advent. Matt. 11. Day's length 9 hours 10 min. 



S. 

M. 

T. 

W 

T. 

F. 

S. 



15 Ignatius 

16 Ananius 

17 Lazarus 

18 Emberday 

19 Abraham 

20 Ammon 

21 St. Thomas 



12 31 


5 40 


«24 


1 20 


6 24 


HE 6 


2 10 


7 26 


HKis 


3 6 


8 29 


$j» 


3 46 


9 30 


jfcpl2 


4 38 


10 21 


^24 


5 18 


11 19 


m % 



Regulus rises 6 6. 

6 % O- Inferior. ^ 

% stationary. 

6 D #. Orion s. 12 3. 

D in apo. Y. sets 7 32. 

6 J) 11 . % rises 9 44. 

Oen. ; ..a£>. Shortest day. 



4 


7 25 


4 


7 25 


3 


7 25 


3 


7 25 


2 


7 25 


2 


7 25 


1 


7 26 



35 
35 
35 
35 
35 
35 
4 34 



51 Uh Sunday in Advent. John I. Day's length 9 hours 10 min. 



M. 
T. 
W. 
T. 

F. 

S. 



22 Beata 

23 Dagobert 

24 Adam, Eve, 

25 Christmas 

26 Stephen 

27 John, Ev. 

28 H. Innoc. 



6 8 


11 54 


&=20 


6 58 




s&? 3 


7 44 


12 40 




8 30 


1 48 


* 


9 16 


2 59 


meu 


10 6 


4 1 


S|g28 


10 56 


5 18 


& 14 



22d. Winter com 
6 D % . % r. 12 14. 

7* south 9 27. 

$ gr. Hel Lat. N. ^ 

$ stationary. 

Rigel south 10 42. 

6 J) $ . Yenus sets 7 *2 



1 


7 25 


4 35 


1 


7 25 


4 35 


sun 


7 25 


4 35 


0" 


7 25 


4 35 


1 


7 25 


4 35 


1 


7 25 


4 35 


2 


7 25 


4 35 



52 Sunday after k Christmas. Luke 2. Day's length 9 hougte 12 mm. 



IS. 

M. 

T. 



29 JNoah 

30 N. Coper n. 

31 Sylvester 



11 40 


6 30 #-29 


12 26 


3s^4aigJ4 


1 31 


6 18^29 



prises 9 17. u 
30th. 6 D S. 
Din per. Sirius s. 11 58 



7 24 
7 24 

7 24 



4 36 
4 36 
4 36 



Moon's Phases. 

First Quarter, the 7th, at 6 o'cloc k 28 m. 
in the morning. 
Full Moon, the 14th, at 4 o'clock 36 m. in 



Conjecture of the weather. 



the evening. 



I 



I, 2, clear; 3, 4, rain ; 5,6, 7, fair ; 8, 9, 10, 

variable,' 11, 13, N. W. ; 13, 14, 15, cold ; 16, 

Last Quarter, the 22d, at 9 o'clock 4 m. 17, cloudy ; 18, 19, snow ; 20, 21, 22, moder- 

in xT he 6 lf *v «u, ,',^0, . ato;23, 24, 25, clear: 26, 27, variable; 56, 29, 
New Moon, the 30th, at 1 o'clock 28 m. in f 

the morning. 30, mostly clear ; 31, rain and snow. 



15 



For the Brethren's Almakac. 
Biographical Sketches. 

Johan Naas, the most eminent of the 
Brethren's early preachers, was born 1669 
or 70, at Norten, a town in the Province 
of Westphalia, 12 miles north of Emden. 
He was one among the first fruits of the 
Brethren in Creyfelt, and on account of 
his disinterested piety and great natural, 
endowments, he was soon called to the 
ministry, in which he manifested so much 
zeal that his field ot labor at Creyfelt ap- 
peared too small for his ardent desire to 
extend the knowledge of the newly dis- 
covered truth. Hence he made several 
very successful tours" through the adjoin- 
ing Provinces as a traveling Missionary, 
in which he suffered many privations, and ' 
once narrowly escaped being pressed into 
the army of the king of Prusia (see anec- 
dote of him in last year's almanac on 
page 23). 

He emigrated to the U. S. of America 
with the second company of the Breth- 
ren, in 1729, and staid with the church at 
Germantown until 1733 ; then he, with 
four other families crossed the Delaware, 
and settled at Amwell, New Jersey, and 
immediately founded a church there, 
which is in a flourishing condition yet to 
this day. During his lifetime this church 
was the spiritual birth place of more 
brethren than perhaps any other in the 
Union. In fact most of the churches were 
planted by emigrants from this ; for, on 
account of their straightened circum- 
stances they were continually moving to 
other and newer settlements, to procure 
cheaper homes. 

It is said by one of his contemporaries 
that knew him well, that he was une- 
qualled as a preacher — being a German 
Whitefield or a Boanerges. Several of 
his hymns, which are still in use by the 
brethren, also speak well of him as a Po- 
et, or Hymnologist. He is farther rep- 
resented as being very mild and charita- 
ble, almost to a fault, insomuch that he 
occasionally differed with the brethren in 
the administration of judgment to of- 
fending members. He die'd ripe in years 



and full of faith, on the 12th of May r 
1741, and is buried amidst many of his; 
spiritual children,in the Brethren's grave- 
yard at Amwell. 

Although he was twice married he left- 
no issue that we know of, except two 
daughters. One of them was married to 
a Bro. Wilhelmus Graw, in Creyfelt, who 
never came to America, The other mar- 
ried to a Hannes Landis, who afterwards 
joined the seventh day Baptists, and 
went to Ephrata, but soon became dissat- 
isfied with that community, and in 1735 
or 6 was reconciled again to the Brethren, 
and became a member of the church in* 
Conestoga where he lived until deaths 
took him home. 

Abraham H. Cassei, 

Ha rleys cille, Pa . 



George Adam Martin. 

George Adam Martin was also aa emi- 
nent preacher among the early brethren. 
He was born near Landstuhle, a moun- 
tain -Fortress of the Lower Pfaltz, in the- 
year 1715, and enjo3 T ed the advantages of* 
a good German education, with considera- 
ble knowledge of the Latin. He was- 
brought up in the Presbyterian, or Pre- 
formed Faith, until about 18 years of age- 
when he became the subject of very deep* 
and pungent convictions, in which distres- 
sed and melancholy state of mind he la- 
bored for several years, until he was led 
to embrace the principles, of the Breth- 
ren, and was baptized by Martin Umer in 
1735, and became a member of Om 
church at Coventry, Chester counij.^ 
Aferwards of Conestoga in Lancaster 
county. He soon distinguished himself 
as a prominent believer — for combined 
with his exemplary faith, were also- 
great natural abilities. Consequently 
though young in years he was soon em- 
ployed by the Brethren on several very 
important missions, which he discharged 
to the satisfaction of the church, and 
credit to himself. He was omniously led 
to preach without being elected, by acci- 
dently opening his Testament on 2 Timo- 
thy 2:15, during a special season of Be- 



16 



tirementin the woods, which he imagined 
to he a call of the Lord, but ielt himself 
30 inadequate and incomp jgo;k fco engage 
in that sacred duty, that Bb caused a very 
great conflict in his mind foi about four 
months, until he obtained perfect peace by 



a total resignation to the 



>f the Lord. 



After which he went forth and preached 
osoceasions required, until 1739 when he 
was formally ordained by Peter Backer* 
and in obedience to a call from the Little 
Conewaga church, he moved beyond the 
Susquehannah, and officiated for a while 
as a faithful minister among the several 
churches which ho assisted to organize 
there, until on account of some misun- 
derstandings which arose between him 
and the Brethren, he moved to the An- 
tietatn, where his labors also appeared to 
be blessed and approved of by the Lord, 
until in an unguarded hour he brought 
scandal upon himself and the church, 
which resulted in a very sad fraternal di- 
vision of the church insomuch that he 
soon organized for tuin&lf with about 60 
members that were in sympathy with 
him, including some of the most eminent 
for piety and virtue. As he continued' 
preaching the same doctrine as before^ 
numbers were added to them by baptisn 
so that his little church increased very 
fast for awhile, but did not last long until 
one after another of those who had left 
the Brethren on his account went back 
and were reconciled with them again. 

About this time (1762) he and several 
of his adht rents paid a visit to the Sev- 
enth day Brethren atEphrata, where they 
were so well received, and felt such a con- 
fluence of spirit, that they united them- 
selves with them, in so far than they ever 
afterwards labored and wo shiped togeth- 
er, although he never formally joined 
them, for he was never re-baptized and nev- 
er kept the seventh day Sabbath. But after 
this association was in so far agreed upon 
the most of his labors wer« with the Ber- 
mudian church in York county, which was 
to a great extent the offspring of Ephrata. 

About 1770 he moved with his family to j 
Stony Creel: m Bedford county, which 



was another offspring of Ephrata, where 
for the most part the seventh day sabbath 
was kept. But whi'e he was not proper- 
ly in fellowship with the Brethren any- 
more at this time, I shall follow him no 
farther ; bat close by saying that he was 
married to a sister Knipper, by whom he 
had many children and grand children, a 
'few of whom are still living in the coun- 
ties above mentioned. 

Although brother Martin did not finish 
his course as we would wish, he was for 
all, as we trust, the happy instrument of 
gathering many souls into the fold of 
Christ. He was a shrewd, far-seeing man 
— a good logical reasoner—a profound 
speaker, and a very ready writer. Be- 
sides his other labors he wrote and pub- 
lished a Book of 152 octavo pages called 
"The Christliche JBibliotheh, which con- 
tains a great many very beautiful ideas. 
He was also the occasion of several impor- 
tant changes and improvements in the 
order and discipline of the Brethren ; as 
for instance, in 1737, he accompanied 
brother Martin Urner on a tour to the 
great swamp, now Bucks county, where 
a number of belie vers w re to be baptized* 
Accordingly after reading the 14tli chap- 
ter of Luke, on building a Tower, and go- 
ing to war with another king. &c, was 
iead to the candidates as their custom 
was already in Europe. Brother Martin 
was much surprised at it when he was 
baptized, but on this occasion the incon- 
sistency of it struck him so forcibly that 
he could not withhold stating his reasons 
publicly against it, whereupon the El- 
ders (Peter Becker being also present) 
said : " What then shall we do f—we 
must say something to the candidates ' 
Without a moment's consideration he 
said : "Why not read the 18th of Matth- 
ew, about admonishing and reproaching" 
which pleased them so well that it w r as 
immediately adopted, and has ever since 
been read on all such occasions, through- 
out the Union. 

With him also originated the first idea 
of having or holding an Annual Meeting 
for conference, which occurred as follow-: 



IT 



In 1742 the Moravians, with the newly ar- 
rived Count Zinzendorfatthe head, pub- 
lished a number of Religious Conferences, 
to which "deputies from all the various 
sects in that part of America icere earnestly 
requested to attend. ' ' Accordingly broth- 
er Martin was delegated by the church of 
Conestogo to represent the Brethren- — 
The object of these conferences was — "If 
possible to promote a closer approxima- 
tion to each other — if not in doctrine 
yet in Love. In order that all judg- 
ing and condemning of each other might 
be done away." Of these conferences 
they had seven, in close succession, of 
three days each, in different parts of the 
country. The one to which brother Mar- 
tin was delegated convened at Oley, 
Berks county. In his report of it to the 
church, he says ho heard many strange 
and singular things, during those three 
days, — that he regarded these conferences 
as a snare to entice the simple and inexpe- 
rienced of the awakened souls back again 
to their former habits of religion, and 
thus estzhlish old Babel again, Where- 
upon the church held a council whnt to 
do for to prevent — or to circumscribe this 
apparent danger, as several of the breth- 
ren were already led astray by their doc- 
trine. It was then proposed to hold an 
Annual conference, or Big Meeting (as 
they call it) ourselves, which met with 
such|a favorable reception and was sounan^ 
imously approved of, that the move was 
immediately adopted, and the time and 
place fixed when mid ichere it should be 
kept. This was as afore said in 1742, which 
is the beginning and true foundation of 
our Annual Meetings. 

Abraham II. Cassel, 

Harleysville, Pa. 

— ♦ ♦ * 

An old Document. 

During that trying period of the 
American Revolution so many false 
and conflicting reports were spread 
^ among the Brethren concerning the 
conduct of brother Christopher Saur 
(Sower) that he deemed it necessary 
to draw up the following statement 
of facts, with the appended queries to 



be read at Annual Meeting to clear 
some of the charges against him, and 
vindicate his conduct so far as inno- 
cent. 

A True Account of what Happen- 
ed to me, Christopher Sower, 
during the late war. 

Having heard how a number of 
Quakers were banished and carried 
away to Virginia, and being informed 
that there were yet some hundreds of 
substantial inhabitants on the list to 
be taken up and secured, among 
which my name was also put down; 
and as there was already a beginning 
made and some of the Millers and 
others on the Wissahicon were actu- 
ally taken away from their families, 
I considered what I would best do. 
Knowing that Germantown would al- 
ways be a disturbed place, for English 
and Americans would continually 
march through it, forwards and back- 
wards, and having three of my chil- 
dren already living in Philadelphia, I 
bethought myself to go there too, — 
to Jive with them in peace. Accord- 
ingly I went to Philadelphia on the 
19th day of October, im, (many 
months before the act was made which 
forbade to go to Philadelphia.) And 
so I lived there quietly and peacea- 
bly till the 23d day of May, 1TT8, 
when I went back to Germantown 
again, and was in my house that night 
and the next day until 10 o'clock in 
the evening, when a strong party of 
captain McLean's company surround- 
ed my house and fetched me out of 
my bed. It being a very dark night, 
they lead me through the Indian corn 
fields, where I could not get along as 
fast as they wanted me to go, so 
they frequently stuck me in the back 
with their bayonets, until they 
brought me to Bastian Miller's barn, 
where they kept me till next morn- 
ing ; then they stripped me naked to 
the skin and gave me an old shirt and 
a pair of breeches so much torn that 
I could barely cover my nakedness. 
Then they cut my beard and hair, and 
painted me with oil colors, red and 
black, and so led me along bare-foot- 



18 



ed and bare-headed, in a very hot 
sun-shining day, until a friend of 
mine seeing me in that condition, ask- 
ed them whether they would take the 
shoes from me if he would give me a 
pair. The officer in charge of me 
gave his word for it that they should 
not be taken from me, and so he took 
the shoes from his own feet, and the 
hat from his head, and gave them to 
me. But after we had marched about 
six miles a soldier came and demand- 
ed my shoes and took them, and gave 
me his old slabs, which were so hard 
and torn that they wounded my feet 
very much. On the 26th, at nine 
o'clock, I arrived at the camp, near 
Valley Forge, and was sent to the 
provo. My accusation in the mitti- 
mus was " an oppressor of the right- 
eous and a spy." On the 2Tth in the 
morning, God moved the heart of the 
most generous General Mulenberg, 
to come to me and inquire into my 
affairs, and promised that he would 
speak to General Washington and 
procure me a hearing, and the next 
day sent me word that I should make 
a petition to General Washington, 
which I did, and through the good 
hand of Providence and the faithful 
assistance of said General Mulenberg, 
I was permitted to go out of the 
provo on the 29th day of May. But 
as I was not free, it being against my 
conscience to take the oath to the 
States, I was not permitted to go 
home to Germantown, as appears by 
the following pass, viz : " Permit the 
bearer hereof, Mr. 3ewers, to pass 
from hence to M*tk,»tfh»v, not to re- 
turn to Germantown daring the stay 
of the enemy in this State, he behav- 
ing as becometh. Given under my 
hand at the orderly office, this thir- 
teenth day of May, IT 78. 

Nicholas Gilman, 
Ass. Adj't. Gen." 
So I went to Methatchey and stay- 
ed there till the 23d of June, wheu I 
returned to Germantown and there 
lived quietly until the 2tth of July, 
when Cols. Smith and Thompson 
came to my house and asked me 
whether I had entered special bail at 



the Supreme Court in Lancaster. I' 
told them no. "Why not?" said 
they. " "Because I had no notice." 
" That cannot be," said Thompson, 
" it was in the newspapers and hand- 
bills." I told them that I had at 
that time been in the provo and at 
Methatchey, and had seen none of 
those papers, and nobody bad told 
me of it till after the time had expir- 
ed. " Have you then taken the oath 
to the States ?" " No," was my re- 
ply. " Why not ; was you. so attach- 
ed to the King ?" " No ; it was not 
the attachment to the King, but be- 
cause you have in your act that they 
who do not take that oath shall not 
have a right to buy or sell, and as I 
find in the book of Revelations that 
such a time will come, when such a 
mark would be given, therefore I 
could not take that oath while it stood 
on that condition." 

" But you went to the English at 
Philadelphia," said Smith. I said 
yes, and do you know why ? "No," 
said he, " nor do I want to know." — 
Then they told me that they were 
come to take an inventory of my per- 
sonal estate and sell it, and to rent 
out my real estates. I told them I 
would submit to all that the Lord 
permitted them to do, and so Smith 
stood guard that I might not put any- 
thing out of the way, and Thompson 
went out to get appraisers and a clerk, 
and so they began to appraise. I 
then begged of them they should let 
me keep my bed, but Smith gave an- 
swer, " they had no right to let me 
have anything besides my clothes 
and provisions (which last they did 
not abide by, for when they found a 
barrel of beef in the cellar, they took 
it down, although it was provision.) 
I then begged for a few medicines 
which I had put by for my family 
use — being chiefly of my own and my 
father's preparations, and nobody else 
knew anything about them, what they 
were : but Smith said no ; medicines 
are very valuable, they must be sold. 
Then I begged for nothing more, ex- 
cept for my spectacles, which was 
finally granted. Then on the 28th 



19 



they told me that I must quit the house 
now, for they must rent it out ; and so 
I moved out of it on the 30th of July. 
Then they proceeded to sell my ef- 
fects. But before the sale came on, 
my son Daniel endeavored to stop it, 
and applied to Thomas Mattock and 
asked him whether his Father should 
not have a hearing. He replied yes. 
But we must sell his effects first. He 
then applied to Mr. Lewis to stop the 
sale till next court, who endeavored 
all he could to do it. But they had 
invented a lie, namely that I or some 
of my people had secretly crept in the 
house, and had destroyed all the New 
Testaments, and that if the sale did 
not go on, all would be destroyed be- 
fore the said court would come on, 
and so they passed on with the sale 
of all my Personal estate and rented 
out my several houses and lands for 
one year, and then sold them also — 
contrary to the concession of the con- 
vention in the case of Forfeited Es- 
tates — by which no Real Estate could 
have been sold before my youngest 
son is of age. And so they have not 
only broken the fundamental rule (of 
the government) in selling my Es- 
tate ; but have also published me, in 
in almost all the newspapers, as a 
Traitor, without any cause, and with- 
out ever giving me a hearing, or trial. 
Although I never had gone a mile 
from my place of abode, and their 
own Attorney Mr. Bradford, has him- 
self declared to a friend of mine, that 
if I had not forfeited my life I had al- 
so not forfeited my Estate, for they 
had no more right to my Estate than 
to my life, &c. 

Query 1st. As there are debts due 
to me on Bonds, Notes, and book ac- 
counts, — who has the best' right to e T e 
mand them of the people, I, or the 
State ? 

Query 2d. If a man is openly de- 
clared a traitor, without a cause or 
without a Hearing or Trial, when he 
was not absent, and might have been 
heard — is it just to let him forever lie 
under that reproach ? 

Query 3d. Is it right that Col. 
Smith be permitted to carry on a Law- 



suit against my son Daniel, and to 
pocket 50 pound hard money to him- 
self when he has paid the State ( — if 
ever he has) with a trifle of continen- 
tal? Abraham H. Cassel. 
Harleysville Pa. 



Abraham Duboy. 

Another eminent preacher among the 
early Brethren was Abraham Duboy, 
an unmarried brother, who devoted himself 
wholly to the service of the Lord. He was 
born in the year 1679, at Epstein, in 
Germany, and brought up in the Pres* 
byterian or Reformed faith, until he em- 
braced the principles of the Brethren. — 
He was baptized and became a member 
of the church at Marienbom in 1712, 
where he stayed until 1715, when the 
persecution became so fierce that the 
church there was scattered. Then he, 
with the most of its members, fled to 
Schwartzenau. But as persecution soon 
began to rage there, too, he emigrated to 
the United States'of America in 1728, and 
took up his abode on the banks of the 
Perkioming, in Montgomery county, Pa. 
From thence, in obedience to a call from 
the Great Swamp church, in Bucks Co., 
Pa,, he settled himself there as their 
minister in 1738, where he remained in 
the faithful discharge of every incumbent 
duty, until removed by death, on the 21st" 
of March, 1748. 

He was eminent for his zeal and unaf- 
fected piety, and through the various con- 
flicts of life he endured hardships as a. 
good soldier of Jesus Christ. In short it 
might be said of him as of Moses of old ■ 
" He was faithful in all his house." He 
was also favored with several remarkable 
visions, and, as it is said, had a very sin- 
gular presentiment of his death. One 
morning as he arose he told the family 
with whom he liyed that the time of his 
departure was at hand- He therefore 
dressed himself in his shroud, (Toden- 
Kleider) which he had in readiness, and 
desired the family to sing with him a few 
verses of that beautiful hymn of Johan 
Arndts : " Nwifahr ichhm mitfreuden. 



20 



ins rcchte Fatherland," cfr. They did 
so : then after a short prayer he reclined 
himself on his couch, which stood close 
by, and instantly breathed his last, with- 
out a sigh or an expiring groan. May we 
not all say: "Lord, let my last end be 
like his " ? Abrm. II. Cassel, 

Barley smile, Pa. 



Adrian Plan, 

THE EXEMPLARY DEACON, OR CONSE- 
CRATED OVERSEER OF THE POOR. 

When the church was by persecution 
driven from. Schwartzenau and Creyfelt, 
the most of them took i<&&%® in West 
Friesland, a province in the north of 
Holland, where they were kindly re- 
ceived. Their doctrine also met with 
such favorable acceptance hat in a short 
time a great many were added to their 
number, including many of rank and uo- 
bility. (In the Apostles' time there were 
some of "Cesar's household." Phil. iv. 
22. ) Among them was one Adrian Pfau, 
vwho became eminent on account of his 
•office as overseer of the poor, (Arm en 
Pfleger.) He distributed annually out 
of his private income one hundred thou- 
sand Hollandish Guilders, (a coin fully 
equivalent to our present American dol- 
lar,) among the poor in Amsterdam. 

Inci editable as this statement may ap- 
pear, there is no reason to doubt the truth 
of it, as Alexander Mack was personally 
well acquainted with him, and in his 
common-place book, we find the follow- 
ing notice of him in his own hand writ- 
ing, which I transcribe verbatim as a cu- 
riosity : 

♦©eftorfcen, in SBeft gHfc£«nfr, 23m= 
&er $t>rian $fau, bcr 3Bunt>erbare 
»on ®oti berujfene unt fetjr ©etreue 
2trmen>$fleger, t>er j a t) r t i d) au$ fet= 
jten aermogen 100,000 9ManlDi£&c <Ml* 
ben amvenbete in 2lm3rerbam. 

Abrm. H. Cassel, 
Harltysvillc, Pa. 

*Died, in West Friesland, brother Adrian 
Pfau, CJod's chosen, faithful overseer of the 
po«- who annually distributor 100,000 Hol- 
landish Guilders, of his own means, in Am- 
sterdam. 



Elder George Klein. 

BY DAVID B. KLEIN. 

He was, I believe, the first minister of 
the Brethren church at Northkill, now 
called the " Little Swatara " church, 
where the late Annual Meeting was held. 
He was born at Zweybruecken, in Ger- 
many, on the 9th day of October, 1715. 
In his early youth he emigrated to Amer- 
ica, and settled near Annville, New Jer- 
sey, where he soon became acquainted 
with the Brethren. In 1739 he was 
buried with Christ in baptism, by Elder 
Johann Naas, who was at that time Pre- 
siding Elder at x\nville. He was soon af- 
ter chosen an assistant in the mi istry. 

In 1750 he moved to Northkill, on the 
Tulpenhocken, to take charge of the 
Northkill church, where he was ordained 
in 1857 by Elders Michael Pfautz and 
Martin Urntr. After a long and useful 
career of ministerial labors, he was final- 
ly gathered home as a shock of corn fully 
ripe, into the garner of the Lord. 

His many decendants are now scattered 
over a number of States, a goodly num- 
ber of whom still hold to the good old 
faith of the Brethren. Sister Merkey, 
where the late annual meeting was held, 
is one of them. A number of his der 
cendents were also called to the ministry 
at different times. 

In 1770 the church at Northkill was 
reduced, by removal to the western val- 
lies of Pennsylvania, to seven families^ 
containing eleven members, whose names 
were : Elder George Keim and wife, 
Valentine Long, Elizabeth Beider, Eliza- 
beth Stump, Elizabeth Brandel, Mary 
Stochner, Sarah Schallenberger, John 
Stochner and wife, and Susanna Mackley. 

Elder John Bars*. 

In addition to the information al- 
ready given I will give you a brief 
history of the oldest Elder in the 
Miami Valley District, which is my 
father. Elder John Darst was born 
in Franklin county, Va , on the 1st 
day of January, A. I). 1790, and is 



21 



now in his 82d year. He emigrated 
to Dayton, Ohio, in the year of 1813 f 
entered a tract of land in Lostcreek 
township, Miami county, Ohio, in 
1811, and moved upon it into a log 
cabin on the 8th of January, 1818^ 
the cabin having neither door nor win- 
dow, and there being not a stick of 
timber cut on the land but what had 
been cut for the cabin. Here he en- 
dured many hardships, which the first 
settlers were used to on the frontiers. 
But in a short time after he settled 
on said tra ct of land, where he still 
resides, he became a member of the 
church of the Brethren, and was soon 
set apart to the ministry. He entered 
upon his duties with perseverance 
and energy, preaching the " gospel ot 
peace,'' and holding forth the glad ti- 
dings ot salvation to a lost and ruin- 
ed world. Much of his time was 
spent visiting and preaching in differ- 
ent localities in Ohio and Indiana. — 
The mode of conveyance was then, 
riding horseback through storm and 
cold. He has now been in the min- 
istry near fifty years, and is almost 
ready to say with Paul, 2 Tim. 4-7. 
He is a grand-son of Elder Jacob 
Miller, the first member of the Breth- 
ren who settled in the Miami Valley, 
and who was a grandfather of Elder 
Jacob Miller, deceased, Portage, In- 
diana. Father Darst is now almost 
blind, and has been for several years, 
but he still attends church at the reg- 
ular appointments, has a clear mind, 
and still labors in the ministry. 



improvements. His income has ever 
been small, but he makes his purchase 
with a resolve that by industry and econv 
omy he will pay for it. In a few years 
his desires are accomplished. "As long 
as he livcfch" the home naturally speak- 
ing is his own ; his physical strength yet 
remains ; .business still continues to pros- 
per ; a few more years of faithful labor 
has brought him a sum of money suf- 
ficient to "make home beautiful;" his 
dwellings which so long were uncomfort- 
able, both in winter and summer, can 
now be replaced by more convenient and 
comfortable ones ; his vineyard need no 
more yield " sour grapes," but by an out- 
lay of a few paltry dollars he can have all 
kinds of delicious, health-preserving 
fruit ; in fact, in time everything around 
him can be rendered comfortable and 
beautiful. But instead of making home 
beautiful he commenees to think how he 
may extend his acres ; his neighbor's' 
firm (;>erliaps in a worse condition than 
his own) is for sale. He purchases that, 
and now, poor man ! he has so many 
cares that he can never again be happy. 
" Better be content with acres few, 

And with flowers thy door-yard strew, ' 

Thau millions of acres own, 

And in thy heart have seeds of sorrow 
sown." 



Make Home Beautiful. 

BY F. M. S. 

Why do not the homes of uncharitable 
or miserly men appear beautiful? Be- 
cause they so love money that they little 
love a beautiful home. Mr. B pro- 
cures a home sufficiently large with poor 



Is the Church ot the Brethren 
the True Church of Christ? 

If we do the will of our Father in heav- 
en, we are all brethren with our Lord Je- 
sus Christ ; and if brethren and sisters 
of his, we certainly belong to his church. 
If it is proven that we have that form of 
religion established by Christ, or by God 
through Christ, and accept it as the 
power of God unto salvation, to them that 
believe, the query heading this article is 
answered in the affirmative. We recog- 
nize the Gospel as our rule and system of 
Theology ; teach that all the commands 
of God as taught in his last will and tes- 
tament are essential to salvation: that 
we are saved through the merits and 
blood of Christ, which, through the mer- 
cy and free grace of God, is granted and 
applied to all who believe in Christ "as 
the scriptures have said," and obey the 
behests of heaven. To any others who 
have willingly sinned there is no prom- 



22 



ise of eternal salvation. The disci- 
ples and true followers of Christ, from 
the earliest period of Christianity to the 
present day, constituted and do consti- 
tute the church of Christ. The church 
has passed through many dark days of 
persecution and corruption, and was 
known to the world under different names 
and organizations ; but an unbroken 
chain has ever linked the true followers 
of Christ to the church of God. The 
powers of darkness have encompassed 
about the church of the living God ; but 
the gates of hell have not, and shall not 
prevail against her. The church exists 
yet as a living monument of the manifold 
goodness and mercy of God ; having 
stood the storms of over eighteen centur- 
ies, she still lives ! Though without 
worldly honor or worldly affluence, she is 
the object of heaven's care, and the me- 
dium through which a sinful world can 
look up to God and heaven with hopes of 
a blessed immortality. J. S. Flory. 

Simon Says "Pow Wow." 

Brother Hohinger : — In writing to you 
about Almanacs a week or more ago, we 
said substantially that the greatest objec- 
tion to your Almanac, by the brethren, 
was, that there were not "signs" and oth- 
er conjectures enough in it. Some have 
said that it did not look much like an Al- 
manac — meaning no doubt that the signs 
conjectures, notable days, &c. were not 
given sufficiently in detail — not being able 
to find all the sage and venerated prog- 
nostications to be found in the old Lancas- 
ter Almanacs. It must be remembered 
that the study of the Almanac, in some 
iamilies, constitutes the most important 
and persistent literary pursuit, with some 
of its members at least. 

Why, my dear brethren, only reflect one 
moment and then say, it you can, why 
you have no more " signs" and memora- 
ble days in your Almanac ; why you give 
no Saint days, Fast days, Holidays, Em- 
ber days, and a host of other particular 
days belonging to every day of the eccle- 
siastical year. And New Year's day you 



have before Christmas day ! You heath- 
en ! How shall we know when comes 
Candlemass, in order to tell whether our 
fodder is going to hold out, or when to 
sprinkle the backs of the cows with ashes 
to exterminate vermin, or when to bake 
"Fausnacht" cakes, and when comes As- 
cension day, so the women use no nee- 
dles on that day, and so be safe from 
lightning? And how in the world will 
the men do to find out the price of wheat 
in advance, if they know nothing about 
Ember days, to say nothing of the weath- 
er which the aspects of these days pre- 
indicate. But when comes Mary over 
the mountain with her apron full of 
clouds, either of dust or of rain ? -And 
when do we look for the day of the coon 
and his shadow, the frogs under their 
icy spectacles ? And when comes Shrove 
Tuesday, Ash Wednesday, Ascension 
Thursday, Good Friday, Easter, Pente- 
cost, &c ? 

The memorable days of profane history 
you have not inserted either. But that 
was right ; we care not half as much about 
them as we do about those having signs 
with them. 

Here you have "What kind of weather 
we are going to have" stuck in a corner 
only about quarter full ? This is a mis- 
take. It is nearly as important to have 
a clear day as. a good sign to butcher in. 

Now just look at that long row of 
"signs." There is one, that looks like 
a Christmas ginger-cake "Ghoul ;" 
that must be the Lion, if that other one 
with a tail like a Lion and horns like rab- 
bits ears is the Goat. But this does not 
make much difference ; some of our folks 
would not hang up meat to smoke in eith- 
er of these two "signs" for anything; be- 
cause the meat would become alive with 
"skippers ;" for certainly this "sign" is 
a representation of something which has 
life in it. The scales is the right "sign" 
to hang up pork in ; it has no life in it, 
consequently can breed no life, anybody 
can see that. You must not understand 
that they want any more of this 
kind of signs, but they wonder why 
you have the "signs" of the Zodiac in 



23 



•the picture around the man with his bow- 
els open so much handsomer now when 
people do very seldom get bled anymore 
than those in the "row,' 7 since those in 
the "row" are all the ones that are much 
used now. There is the Bull— he looks 
like a pranking little whiffet. And you 
cannot tell which is the crab or the Scor- 
pion ; one looks like a corn Whisk, and 
the other like a dead chicken with all the 
feathers plucked off. The Ram looks, 
for all the world, like a sick kitten. Now 
this all is exceedingly objectionable in so 
important a matter. You can tell pretty 
well which is the Virgin, however, so the 
women can tell when not to plant Cucum- 
ber seed for fear the vines would all run 
to blossom. Here I see in January 1871, 
too. that you have placed the down-point- 
ing moon one line too high up. You 
must correct that in the New Almanac, 
for "' 72, else some of the sisters might 
make a mistake and set their little onions 
out one day too soon, and have their crop 
very much injured, if not entirely ruined; 
for onions will always manage to come on 
top of the ground when they are set out 
when the moon points up. (Just now I 
see that I have made a little mistake; but 
everybody knows that I mean, if the moon 
should be plaeed in the wrong line in on- 
ion planting time). Who so stupid, my 
friends, but knows from actual observa- 
tion, that fruit trees which blossom in 
the dark of the moon invariably fail to 
Ibear a fair or full crop of fruit during the 
same season ? When so much knowledge 
depends upon having the moon correctly 
placed in the Almanac, I claim that it is 
very nearly a crime for the printer to be 
careless about these matters. I am an 
earnest man, and generally speak in an 
earnest manner ; but that is my way, I 
cannot help it. It is far from my inten- 
tion to wound the feelings of anyone. — 
What farther shall we say ? Time would 
fail me to speak of the tenth part of the 
instances on record, well established, too, 
of roofing shingles turning up with nails 
along ; of others remaining clown ; • of 
bodies thrown upon the grass settling 
down, and vice versa ; of worm fences 
settling down, and 'post fences heaving 
up : of butchering in the wrong sign of 
the moon, so as to have your meat shrink 
back upon the bone in boiling it ! 

Now I must tell you how a fellow — 
who does not believe in the "signs of the 
Almanac" and "Powwowing" for sick- 
nesses, and such foolishnes — as he calls it 
— came to grief one evening in a store. — 
"Well now," he says, "tell me, how is it 
when you bury a man- when the moon 



points down ? will he be going down all 
the time as long as the world stands ?— 
And if you bury him when the moon 
points up, will he be coming up, if the 
world stands long enough, until he 
heaves out of the ground,— coffin and all?" 
This he said in a great, swaggering style. 
But he was told that a man who would 
talk that way about a fellow-man was fit 
to be classed with brutes. That man 
was too much excited, perhaps, to tell 
him or think that the influence of the 
moon only extended to the depth of the 
winter frost. And so it likely is as to land. 
Human bodies are mostly buried below 
the line of frost. W r e hear of bodies ly- 
ing scattered over the great plains of the 
west, but those are probably the bodies of 
Indians, and emigrants, some of which 
were never buried at all. and others but 
slightly, whose appearance would be a 
matter of course, if buried when the moon 
points up. But show me a human or 
other body, as light as the soil in which 
it is buried, and has "been so buried for 
thousands of years, above the line of 
frost, and I will undertake to show you 
the influence of the moon in keeping it 
there. This applies to ante-diluvian as 
well as post-diluvian. Does not Moses 
teach us that the lights were set in the 
heavens "for signs and for seasons, and 
for days and years." Gen. 1 : 14. 

It is said by many that pains, aches, 
eruptions, felons, carbuncles, cataracts, 
rose, erysipelas, neuralgia, tooth-ache; 
and so on, can never be cured by means 
of what they are pleased to call ^pow- 
wow." It is only necessary to state that 
this is one of the " Gifts " spoken of by 
Paul, 1 Cor.xii. 9, which probably many 
pious Christians have been endued with 
since the beginning of the Christian era. 
We have very many cases of this kind in 
our midst, everywhere in this country, 
some of which are probably as well au- 
thenticated as the "divers diseases" 
spoken of on the sacred page. And why 
not as well of " healing," as of tongues, 
of interpretation, of faith, &c. ? 

Now, in conclusion, we wish to say, if 
anyone believes that he is able to show 
that the foregoing homely declarations,' 
facts, or arguments, as you choose to call 
them, are illusive and unscriptural, it is 
certainly high time that it was done ; be- 
cause some of you have perhaps no ade- 
quate conception of how extensively they 
are held, and how firmly they are main- 
tained. We want some person to tell us 
what these "signs" are made for and 
put into our Almanacs if they are not to 
be used as we do use them. Let your 



24 



logic come plain and pointed, but respect- 
ful and civil ; for no one is more desirous 
to "weed out" superstition than your 
unworthy fellow traveling pilgrim to a 
better world. The time has come when 
judgment must begin at the house of 
God, if these are not truthful views. 
Yours for the truth, 

Adam Braefogle. 

An Anecdote. 

In the latter part of the summer of 
1862 — the time which tried men' s.faith^- 
a certain very noisy individual^ from a 
neighboring county came to Indiana and 
stood in a public place and read from a 
paper which he held in his hand, what, 
he said, was the form of the "oath" non- 
resistants were required to take in order 
to secure exemption from the then pend- 
ing ' ' draft, ' ' After reading the same he 
named certain brethren in his county who, 
he said, had taken said "oath," and at 
the same time calling them rebels, cow- 
ards, &o., with numerous other appro- 
brious epithets. At last a bystander, 
inspired with sentiments similar to his 
own, asked, : ' On what principles do they 
claim such rights ?" " Because they pre- 
tend to believe we should obey > the in- 
junction not to render evil for evil, and if 
smitten on one cheek to turn the other 
also/' " Well," says the inquirer, "if I 

meet Mr. — I will hit him a big slap 

on the cheek, and see whether he will 
stick to the principle. ' ' A modest broth- 
er here iuterposed with, ''What if he 
should turn the other?" Our chival- 
rous individual here thought best not to 
answer — suppose he feared if he said 
" strike again" his character as a man 
would suffer a discount, and if the contra- 
ry, it would be atmitting the advantage 
of non-resistence. . 



North-EasternDistrict of Ohio, Mohi- 
con congregation, Wayne county, at the 
meeting-house, at brother Jacob Garver's. 



Eastern District of Pennsylvania, in 
the Coventry branch, Chester county, on 
Thursday, one week before Ascension day. 
Pottstown, on the Philadelphia and Bead- 
ing railroad, is the nearest station. J ohn 
Harley, Pottstown, Pa., corresponding 
secretary. 



Northern District of Indiana, — compos- 
ed of 30 branches of Indiana, and 3 of 
Michigan, — Pine Creek congregation, 
East meeting-house, on Thursday, four 
weeks before the Annual Meeting. 

Western District of Maryland : four 
congregations; Beaver Creek meeting- 
house, third Tuesday after Easter. Em- 
anuel Slifer, Burkittsville, Md., clerk. 



Annual Meeting tor 1872. 

On the premises of brother Cyrus Hoo- 
ver, near Wooster Summit, Wayne coun- 
ty Ohio, commencing the first Tuesday 
after Pentecost, being the twenty-first 
day of May: ' ' 

xVll the ordained ciders ot the church 
are requested to be presfeut at the place 
of meeting, on Whit Monday, May 20. 
♦» m 

District Meetings tor 1872, 

South-Western District of Ohio, in the 
Little Bear Creek congregation, at the 
meeting-house, six miles west of Dayton, 
on the National Turnpike, third Tuesday 
before Pentecost. 



Kansas and Nebraska District, in the 
Eight Mile congregation, Franklin coun- 
ty, Kansas, first Monday in May. 













o 

JO 


Planet 


Shrove 
Tuesd. 


Easter 


Whit- 
sontide. 


1872 


Mercury 


13. Feb. 


31. Mar. 


19. May 


1173 


Moon 


25. * 


13. Apr. 


1. June 


1874 


Saturn 


17. t: 5. " 


24. May 


1875 


J upiter 


9. u 


28. Mar.jlC. u 


1876 


Mars 


29. " 


16. Apr.) 4. June 

1. '• 120. May 


1877 


Sun 


13. " 


1878 


Venus 


5; Mar. 


21. " • 9. June 


1879 


Mercurv 


25. Feb. 


13. c; 1. " 


1880 


Moon 


10. " 


28. Mar. 


16. Mav 


1881 


Saturn 


1. Mar. 


17. Apr. 


5. June 


1882 


Jupiter |2l. Feb. 


9. " 128. May 



] A TABLE SHOWING THE PROPER PROPOR- 
TION OF THE HEIGHT OF INDIVIDUALS 
TO THEIR WEIGHT. 



5 feet 1 inch should weigh 120 pounds. 



5 " 


2 ' ; 


it 


w 


125 • " 


5 " 




a 


U 


130 


5 " 


4 ' ; 




. a 


135 


5 " 


5 " 




u 


140 ;c 


5 a 


6 " 




;c 


143 


5 " 


7 " 




a 


145 


5 " 


.8 '•'• 


i. 


u 


148 


5 " 


9 " 


■ Li 


a . 


155 


5 " 


10 " 


u 


<< 


160 


5 " 


11 t; 


u 


(( 


165 


6 " 


u 


u 


a 


170 



25 



Karnes and Addresses of Ministers. 



Albough, Z., Hagerstown, Ind., dec'd. 
Allensworth, John B. , Vincennes, Ind. 
America, Sylvanus, Merriam, Ind. 
Anglernyer, John, New Paris. Ind. 
Amich, "Jos., Burnett's Creek, Ind. 
Arnold, Joseph, Brandt, Ohio. 
Arnold, Solomon, Freedom, Tenn. 
Arnold, Whitrnore, Somerset, Ohio. 
Ayres, John, Paola, Kansas. 

B. 

Baer, Moses T., Bear Lake Mills, Mich. 
Bacon, Win,, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Bahr, Jacob, Moulton, Iowa. 
Baily, Thomas, Mt, Etna, Ind. 
Baily, Wm, Raleigh C. H. West Va. 
Bailey, Garrett, Miller, N. C. 
Bakener, Frederick, Quincy, Pa. 
Baker, Jo nathan, H., Meyersville, Md. 
Baker, Samuel, Greenville, Ohio. 
Baker, Geo. R., Altoona, Iowa, 
Baker, Dan., Newton, Stephensburg, Va. 
Barkley, Josiah, Somerset, Pa. 
Barkloo, Samuel, Ontario, Iowa. 
Barkloo, David, Ontario, Iowa. 
Barnes, Flemon, Brandonville, W. V. 
Bamhart, Daniel, Centropolis, Kan. 
Barnhart, John, Mahomet, 111. 
Barnhart, Abraham, Goginsville, Va, 
Barnhart, George, Goginsville, Va. 
Barnhart, John N., Walkerton, Ind. 
Barnhart, George, Walkerton, Ind. 
Bartow, Isaac, Millerstown, Pa. 
Bashore, John, Jonesboro, Tenn. 
Bashore, Conrad, Jonesboro, Tenn. 
Bates, David, Fairfield, Ohio 
Beachley, Jacob, Somerfield, Pa. 
Beahm, Henry, Salem, Va. 
Beagle, Eli, Dunkirk, 0. 
Beaver, Adam, Lewisburg, Pa. 
Beaver, John L. , Vicksburg, Pa. 
Beale, Jesse, Waterloo, Iowa. 
Beckner, Abraham, Whitesburg, Tenn. 
Beckner, Perry, Bull's Gap, Tenn. 
Beckner, Joseph, Markleysburg, Pa. 
Becker, George S., Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Beeghley, Josiah, Accident, Md. 
Beer, Daniel. Middleton, Md. 
Beer, Jos. W., Dale City, Pa. 
Beer, Peter, Decker's Point, Pa. 
Beer, Solomon, Somerset, Pa. 
Beer, George, Middletown, Md. 
Beelman, Adam, Dillsburg, Pa. 
Bennet, James M. , Jones Mill, Pa. 
Benshoof, Solomon, Johnstown, Pa. 
Berkey, Jacob, Goshen, Ind. 
Berkey, Joseph, Scalplevel, Pa. 
Berkley, Cornelius, Dale City, Pa. 
Berry, Thomas, Whitehorn, Tenn. 
Beshoar, Joseph, Whitesville, Mo. 



Beshoar, Benjamin, Whitesville, Mo. 
Biglei\ Andrew, Goshen, Ind. 
Billheimer, Isaac. Jonesboro, Tenn. 
Black. A. G., Macomb, Ills. 
Blocher, David, Gettysburg, Pa. 
Blough, Emanuel J., Davidsville, Pa. 
Blough, Tobias, Davidsville, Pa. 
Blough, Valentine, Somerset, Pa. 
Blough, Jacob, Berlin, Pa. 
Blough, Jonathan W., Dibertsville, Pa. 
Bock, David, Greencastle, Pa. 
Bock, Samuel, Ovid, Ind. 
Bock, Daniel, Miainisburg, Ohio. 
Boice, Samuel, Elizabeth, W. Va. 
Bollinger, Gideoi?, Chatham Centre, 0. 
Bomberger, Christ, , Rothsville, Pa. 
Bond, Thomas, French Creek, W. Va. 
Bonebrake, D. H., Jackson Hall, Pa. 
Book, Edmond, Blain, Pa, 
Booze, Jacob, Coopersburg, Pa. 
Borger, Joseph, Jones' Mills, Pa. 
Bosserman, Eleazer, Dunkirk, Ohio. 
Bosserman, Daniel, Dunkirk, Ohio. 
Bosserman, David, Gettysburg, Pa. 
Bowers, Peter, Noble, 111. 
Bowers, Abner, Clowser,s Mills, Ind, 
Bowers, A. J., Clowser's Mills, Ind. 
Bowers, Martin, Clark's Hill, Ind. 
Bowers, David, Hartville, Ohio. 
Bower, John, Willow Springs, Kansas. 
Bowser, Peter, Codorus, 111. 
Bowman, John, Bonbrook, Va: 
Bowman, Benjamin, Dayton, Va, 
Bowman, David, lk 

Bowmian Benjaman, Green Mount, Va. 
Bowman, Daniel, Hagerstown, Ind. 
Bowman, Jacob, Hagerstown, Ind. 
Bowman, David, Hagerstown, Ind. 
Bowman, David, New Lebanon, Ohio. 
Bowman, John W., Altoona, Iowa. 
Bowman, Abraham L., Griers Point, Pa. 
Bowman, Peter, Little River, Va. 
Bowman, George, Boons Creek, Tenn. 
Bowman, Joseph, Johnsons City, Tenn. 
Boyer, William, Mount Alto, Pa. 
Boyer, Allen, Lena, 111. 
Boyk, Philip, New Windsor, Md. 
Brallier, Samuel, Ebensburg, Pa. 
Brallier, Daniel, Ebensburg, Pa. 
Bricker, George W., Clayhck, Pa. 
Bright, Isaac, Dayton, Ohio. 
Brillhart, John, Chatfield, Ohio. 
Brindle, Cyrus, Allen, Pa. 
Brindle, John, Greason, Pa. 
Brower, David, South English, Iowa. 
Brower, Israel, Dayton, Ohio. 
Brower, Daniel, Lima, Ohio. 
Brower, John, Hermitage, Va. 
Brower, Enoch L. , Waynesboro, Va. 
Brower, Jacob, South English, Iowa. • 
Brower, Daniel, dec'd., Waynesboro, Va. 
Brown, Joel, Ervin, Ind. 
Brown. P. J., Congress, Ohio. 



26 



Brown. Adam, Hampton, Pa. 
Brown, Peter, Hampton, Pa. 
Brown, S. H.,Batavia, Iowa. 
Brubaker, Daniel, E. Iowa Centre, Iowa. 
Brubaker, John, Salem, Va. 
Brubaker, Elias, Salem, Va. 
Brubaker, Peter, Centropolis, Kansas. 
Brubaker, Moses, Salem, Va. 
Brubaker, Christian^ Neffsville, Pa. 
Brubaker, Nicholas, Dayton, Ohio. 
Brubaker, Henry, Borneo, Tenn. 
Brubaker, John, Borneo, Tenn. 
Brubaker, Jonathan, Romeo, Tenn. 
Brumbaugh, George, Clover Creek. Pa. 
Brumbaugh, J. W., Clover Creek, Pa. 
Brumbaugh Geo. W., Clover Creek, Pa, 
Brumbaugh, I., dec'd., James Creek, Pa. 
Brumbaugh, Geo. B , James Creek, Pa. 
Brumbaugh, H. B. James Creek, Pa. 
Brumbaugh, John, James Creek, Pa. 
Brumbaugh George, James Creek, Pa, 
Brumbaugh, David, New Lebanon, Ohio. 
Brumbaugh, Henry, New Baltimore, 0- 
Brunk, Joseph, Monomonee, Wis. 
Brunk, Henry, Greentown. Ind. 
Brass, William, Antioch, Ind. 
Bryant, William, Clark's Hill, Ind. 
Bucher, Christian, Shsefferstown, Pa. 
Bucner, George, Cornwall, Pa. 
Bucher, John, Abbottstown, Pa, 
Bucher, Joseph, Dillsburg, Pa, 
Buckalew, Jacob, Plymouth, Kansas. 
Buckalew, William, Broadway Depot, Va. 
Buechley, E. K. , Waterloo, Iowa. 
Buechley, Emanuel, Waterloo, Iowa 
Buechley, Jeremiah, Accident, Md. 
Buechley, David, Liscomb, Iowa. 
Buechley, Benjamin, Hudson, Iowa. 
Buechley, Benjamin, Jane Lew, W. Va. 
Burgard, J. G., Fandon, 111. 
Burkhart, Joseph, Mineral Point, Pa. 
Burkh older, John, New Paris, Ind. 
Burger, Joseph, Donegal, Pa. 
Bushman, Michael, Gettysburg, Pa. 
Butterbaugh, Jacob, Liscomb, Iowa. 
Byers, William, Ebensburg, Pa. 
Byers, David, Maximo, Ohio. 

C. 

Cadwalader, John, Pleasant Hill, Ohio. 
Calvert, Ira, Lawrenceville, 111. 
Calvert, Jesse, Milford, Ind. 
Calvert, Mills, Lovetts, Ohio. 
Calvin, Moses, Mt. Etna, Ind. 
Carpenter, Joseph, Greentown, Ind. 
Cassel, Abraham, Lower Providence, Pa. 
Cassel, Henry, Royer's Ford, Pa. 
Castle, A. H., Brownsville, Md. 
Caylor, John H., Noblesville, Ind. 
Caylor, D. S. 5 Greentown, Ind. 
Caylor, Elias, Arcadia, Ind. 
Clapper, Daniel, Louisville, Ohio. 



Clapper, Henry, Yellow Creek, Pa. 
Clark, William, Inwood, Ind. 
Clark, William, Johnson City, Tenn. 
Clark, Hendricks, Paola, Kansas. 
Clay, Henry, Springfield, Mo. 
Clay, Henry, Willard. Mo. 
Clement, John A., N. Georgetown, 0. 
Click, John, Ladoga, Ind. 
Cline, Jacob. Mt. Sidney, Va. 
Cline, John, Broadway Depot, Va, 
Cline, Frederick, Mt, Clinton, Va. 
Cline Michael, Broadway Depot, Va. 
Cline, Samuel, Cross Keys, Va. 
Cober, Ephraim, Berlin, Pa. 
Cober, John, P., Berlin, Pa. 
Cochanower, Emanuel, East Berlin, Pa. 
Coder, Martin, Dawson Station, Pa. 
Coontz, Henry, Waynesboro, Pa. 
Coppock, Samuel, Tippecanoe, Ohio. 
Corder, James H. , Livingston, Iowa. 
Correll, A. J. Romeo, Tenn. 
Cossner, Martin, Greenland, West Va. 
Cost, Andrew, Beaver Creek, Md. 
Cox, Samuel M., Sabb^h Rest, Pa, 
Cripe, George, Warsaw, Ind. 
Cripe, Daniel, Pettit, Ind. 
Cripe, Isaac, Pyrmont, Ind. 
Christ, John, Virden, 111. 
Christ, Jacob, North Hampton, Ohio. 
Cripe, Joseph, Salem, 111. 
Cross white, Jesse, Jonesboro, Tenn. 
Crumpacker, Abiaham, Blacksburg, Va. 
Crumpacker, Peter, Blacksburg, Va. 
Custer, C, 409 Franklin st., Phila., Pa. 
Custer, Josiah, Dunbarton, Ohio. 
Custer, Jacob, Hollowtown, Ohio. 

D. 

Danner, Jesse, Summurn, 111. 
Danner, Henry, Summurn, HI. 
Darst, John, Troy, Ohio. 
Darst, B. F., Zimmerman, Ohio. 
Davis, C, Dunkirk, Ohio. 
Davy, H. D. , Casstown, Ohio. 
Deardorff, A. M., Franklin Grove, 111. 
Deardorff, Daniel, Franklin Grove, 111. 
Deeter, Absalom, Marshalltown, Iowa. 
Deeter, William R, , Grandsville, Ind. 
DeHaven, Jonas, Abilene, Kansas. 
Derrick, David D., Rogersville, Tenn. 
Detrick, Abraham, Salem, Ohio. 
Dice, Philip, Newtonia, Mo. 
Dickey, A. L. Ashland, Ohio. 
Dill, Philip, Newtonia, Mo. 
Dobbins, James T. , Walcot, Ind. 
Domer, George, Milford, Ind. 
Domer, Jacob, Wawaka, Ind 
Drake, Jesse, Milford, Ind. 
Driver, Samuel, Swoops Depot, Va, 
Dunkin, Umphrey, Floyd, C.'H., Va. 
Durand, Sylvester, Waterville, Min. 
Durst, John R., Shade Mills, Md. 



27 



E. 

Ebersole, John P., Fostoria Ohio. 
Eby, Joseph, Brimfield, Ind. 
Eby, Enoch, Duncanuon, 111. 
Eby, Isaac, New Germantown, Pa, 
Eckerman, Daniel, Middlesprings, Pa. 
Edmister, Warden, Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 
Eikenberry, Isaac, Delphi, Ind. 
Eikenberry, J. P., Elm Springs, Iowa. 
Eikenberry, J, E. , Elm Springs, Iowa, 
Elliott, Joseph M., Plymouth, Kansas. 
Ellis, Benjamin, Elm Springs, Iowa. 
Emmert, Leonard, Benevola, Md. 
Emmert, Michael, Adaline, 111. 
Eshleman, John, Woodburry, Pa. 
Eshleman, David, Mohrsville, Pa, 
Eshleman, John, Ottawa, Kansas. 
Etter, William, Chambersburg, Pa. 
Etter, John, Salem, Va. 
Etter, John, Palmyra.Pa. 
Etter, Daniel, Union Deposite, Pa. 

F. 

Fisher, Jacob H., Batavia, Iowa. 
Fishel, J. H., Batavia, Iowa. 
Fitz, John, Astoria, 111. 
Flack, George, Congress, Ohio. 
Fleshman, Elijah, Lindside, West Va. 
Fleshman, Andrew, Lindside, West Va. 
Flory, Abraham, Delphi, Ind. 
Flory, Jacob, Delphi, Ind- 
Flory, J. S-, Fayette ville, West, Va. 
Flory, Jacob, Goginsville, Va. 
Flory, Abraham, Salem, Ohio- 
Fogelsanger, J. R., Shippensburg, Pa. 
Fogelsanger, David, Shippensburg, Pa. 
Forney, Michael, Parkersburg, 111. 
Ford, Albert, Mallet Creek, Ohio. 
Forney, Samuel M-, Parkersburg, 111. 
Forney, Edmond, Polo, 111. 
Forney, Henry, Hudson, 111. 
Forrer, Samuel, Stewart's Draft, Va. 
Foust, Jeremiah, Jones' Mills, Pa- 
Fowler, Marcus, Yellow Creek, 111. 
Foultz, Thomas, -Rainsboro, Ohio. 
Frame, Gabrial, Elkhart, Ind. 
Franklin, William H., Sam's Creek, Md. 
Frantz, Abraham, Degraff, Ohio. 
Frantz, J. L-, Degraff, Ohio- 
Frantz, David, Cerro Gordo, 111- 
Frantz, Aaron, Northampton, Ohio- 
Frantz, Matthias, Ladoga, Ind. 
Frantz, John, New Carlisle, Ohio- 
Freed, Peter, Dunkirk, Ohio- 
Fritz, John, Richland, Iowa. 
Fry, Daniel, Lena, 111. 
Fry, Daniel, Falls City, Nebraska. 
Fry, Enoch, Pendleton, Ind. 
.Fry, Levi, Indiana, Pa. 
Fultz, Samuel, Boonsboro, Md- 
Fundenberg, George, Donnellsville, 0. 



Funk, John, Peoria, Iowa. 

Funk, A. L., Shirleysburg, Pa. 

Funk, Peter, Polo, 111. 

Funk, Benjamin, Singer's Glen, Va, 

Furry, Leonard. New Enterprise, Pa 

G. 

Gable, Emanuel, East Berlin, Pa* 
Garber, Samuel, Altoona, Iowa. 
Garber, Michael, Altoona, Iowa, 
Garber, Michael, New Hope, Va- 
Garber, S- A-, Leon, Iowa. 
Garber, John B-, Shirleysburg, Pa^ 
Garber, Joseph, Tipton, Iowa- 
Garber, Solomon, Bridgewater, Va, 
Garber, Abraham, Mt. Sidney, Va, 
Garber, Levi, Mt. Sidney, Va. 
Garber, Abraham, Romeo, Tenn. 
G rber, D. H., Batavia, Iowa. 
Garlach, David, Mt- Joy, Pa. 
Garman, John II. , Sinking Springs, 0. 
Garst, Henry, Pleasant Hill, Tenn. 
Garver, Jacob, Lattasburg, Ohio- 
Garver, Joseph, Congress, Ohio- 
Garver, Samuel, Chatham Centre, 0. 
Garver, George, Dayton, Ohio- 
Gettel, Samuel, Behrersburg, Pa- 
Gibble, John, Manheim, Pa- 
Gibson, D. B-, Plattsburg, Mo- 
Gibson, C- C, Girard, 111. 
Gipe, Joseph, Chambersburg, Pa. 
Gish, Henry, Camden, Ind. 
Gish, James R., Secor, 111. 
Gish, George W., Secor, 111. 
Gish, JohnH., Secor, 111. 
Gish, William, Cook's Ford, Kansas. 
Glass, Lewis, North Georgetown, 0. 
Glick, Daniel, Flasrstone, Mo. 
Glock, John G., Shirleysburg, Pa. 
Gnagy, Joel, Dale City, Pa, 
Good, Daniel F., Waynesboro, Pa. 
Goodman, John W., Woburn, 111. 
Gottwals, John, Fairview, Pa. 
Gottwals, Jacob Z., Oaks, Pa. 
Gouchenour, H. C, Waterloo, Iowa. 
Graham, Thomas, Brooklyn, Iowa, 
Gray, Thomas, York, Pa. 
Gray, Tazwell, Lancaster, Mo. 
Gray, Elkana, Freedom, Tenn. 
Graybill, Samuel, Manheim, Pa. 
Grossnickle, David, Ladiesburg, Md. 
Grow, J. B., Rigdon, Ind. 

H. 

Hackman, Jacob, Brunersville, Pa. 
Hall, Larken, Marshalltown, Iowa, 
Ham, Solomon D., Astoria, Ind. 
Hamilton, Heil, Poplar Grove, Ind. 
Hanawalt, Jos. R,, McVeytown, Pa. 
Hanawalt, George, McVeytown, Pa. 
Hanawalt, Isaac, Monticello, Ind. 
Hansel, John, Frederick, Iowa. 



28 



Harduian, Joseph, Milford, Ind. 
Harley, Samuel, Ephrata, Pa. 
Hariey, Samuel, Harleysville, Pa. 
Harley, Jonas, Harleysville, Pa. 
Hariey, Benjamin, Royer's Ford, Pa. 
Harley, John, Pottstown, Pa. 
Harman, George, Hagerstown, Md. 
Harmon, B. J., Agency City, Iowa. 
Harnisb, Jacob, New Bloomfield, Pa. 
Harper, Addison, Harden, Mo. 
Harris, James, Moorsburg, Tenn. 
Harshberger, Henry, Salem, 111. 
Harshberger, Henry, Bloody Run, Pa. 
Harshberger, John J. ,. Cross Keys, Ya. 
Harshberger, John, Johnstown, Pa. 
Harshberger, John, Port Republic, Va. 
Harshberger, William R,, Ladoga, Ind. 
Harshey, John, Cornelia, Mo. 
Harshey, Isaac, Neosho Falls, Kansas. 
Harter, David, New Madison, Ohio. 
Hart, John, Lawrenceville, Ind. 
Hartinan, Christian, Mt. Meridian, Va. 
Hartzler, William, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Hartsough, Joseph, Larwill, Ind. 
Heiney, Daniel, Antioch, Ind. 
Helton, Austin, Boon's Creek, Tenn. 
Hendricks, Daniel, Coon Creek, Mo 
Hendricks, Pranklin, Coon Creek, Mo. 
Hendricks, Noah, Freemont, Ohio. 
Hendricks, Joseph, Cerro Gordo, 111. 
Helton, Hardin P., Greasy Creek, Va 
Herr, John. Meyerstown, Pa. 
Hertzler, John, Bethel, Pa. 
Hess, Moses, Goshen, Ind. 
Metric, Jesse P. , Oakland, Pa. 
Lleyser, Emanuel, Madison, Ga 
Hiatt, Elihu, Rigdon, Ind. 
Hier, Isaac, Trot wood, Ohio. 
Highberger, Jacob, Sharpsburg, Md. 
Hildebrand, Stephen, Mineral Point, Pa. 
Hildebrand, David, Conemaugh, Pa. 
Hilkey, James, Willow Springs, Kansas. 
Hillery, William H., Grand River, Iowa. 
Hillery, Lemuel, Marshalltown, Iowa. 
Himes, Levi, Rogersville^ Ind. 
Hipe, William, Lime Springs, Iowa. 
Hire, Absalom, Palestine, 111. 
Hixon, Armanus J., Highland, Ohio. 
Hobbs, C. L., Plattsburg, Mo. 
Hochstettler, Abraham, Waterloo, Iowa. 
Hochstetler, Henry P., Davidsville, Pa. 
Ilockenberry, James H . , Arcadia, Ind. 
Hockman, Jacob, Brunersville. Pa. 
Hoff, Henry, Dughill, Md. # 
Holler, George, Dayton, Ohio. 
Holler, John, Hagerstown, Ind. 
Holler, Christian, Osawkie, Kansas. 
Hollinger, Joseph, Campbellstown, Pa. 
Hollinger, Jacob, Campbellstown, Pa. 
Hollinger, Daniel, Campbellstown, Pa. 
Hollinger, Adam, Bermudian, Pa. 
Hollinger, Daniel, White House, Pa. 
Hollinger, Jacob, White House, Pa. 



Hollowbush, Peter, Pottstown, Pa. 
Holsinger, D. M., Clover Creek, Pa. 
Holsinger, Daniel, Waynesboro, Pa. 
Holsinger, Henry R., Dale City, Pa. 
Holsinger, John, Luray, Ind- 
Holsinger, John S., Alum Bank, Pa. 
Holsinger, John, Woodbury, Pa. 
Holsople, Joseph, Indiana, Pa. 
Holsople, Jacob, Scalplevel, Pa. 
Hook, John L-, Selbysport, Md. 
Hoover, Cyrus, Summit, Ohio. 
Hoover, George, Sulphur Springs, Ind. 
Hoover, George A., Graceham, Md. 
Hoover, George, Mechanicstown, Md. 
Hoover, John, Sulphur Springs, Ind. 
Hoover, Joseph J. , Barryville, Ohio. 
Hopkins, Joseph, Willow Springs, Kan. 
Hoppock, J. D., Sergeantsville, N. J. 
Home, Elijah, Somerset, Ohio. 
Home, Elijah, Jr. , Somerset, Ohio. 
Horner, D. D. ; Jones' Mills, Pa. 
Horner, William M. , Dale City, Pa. 
Houser, Joseph, Buckannon, West Va. 
How, William, Lewistown, Pa. 
Howard, Isaiah, New Cumberland, Ind. 
Humble, William, Willard, Mo. 
Hutchinson, A., Oak Hill, West Va- 
Hutchinson, Joseph, Oak Hill, W. Va- 
Hutchinson, Sam'l J., Oak Hill, W. Va. 
Hutchinson, Jas- M., Lindside, W. Va. 
Hyde, Robison. Sand Brook, N. J. 
Hyer, Leonard, Merriam, Ind. 
Hyer, Wesley, Columbia City, Ind. 

I. 

Ikenberry, W., Waterloo, Iowa. 
Irwin, George, Golden Corner, Ohio- 
Isenbere:, Simeon, Rogersville, Tenn- 
Iset, John, Grater's Ford, Pa- 



Jamagin, Isaac W., Hillsboro, Ohio. 
Jewett, George W., Huntingdon, Ind- 
John, Chrisman, Adrian, Pa- 

K. 

Karn, G-, Wheeling, Ind. 
Kauffman, Joseph, De Graeff, 0. 
Kauffman, Peter B-, East Berlin, Pa. 
Keefer, Christian, Hagerstown, Md- 
Keiffer, Jacob, Union Deposit, Pa- 
Keim, David, Bethel, Pa- 
Keim, Josiah, Louisville, Ohio- 
Keim, Silas O, Elklick, Pa- 
Keim, Jacob S-, Centropolis, Kan- 
Keller, Daniel, Dickinson, Pa- 
Kelso, Jacob, Elderton, Pa. 
Kelso, Jonathan, Elklick, Pa. 
Kilhefner, Henry, Ashland, Ohio- 
Kimmell, Lewis, Elderton, Pa- 
Kimmell, David, Auburn, 111. 
Kindig, David E., Fisherville, Va. 
Kindig, Jacob J-, Minonk, 111. 



29 



Kindig, Joshua, Mohrville, Pa. 
King, Joshua, Tuckerton, Pa. 
Kinney, George, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Kinsey, Lewis, Hagerstown^ Ind. 
Kinsey, Samuel, Dayton, Ohio. 
Kingery, Christian H., Camden, Ind. 
Klick, Samuel, Nevada, Mo. 
Kline, David, Timberviile, Va. 
Kline, Frederick, Brid^ewater, Ya. 
Kline, Samuel, New Market, Va. 
Knisely, John, Plymouth, Ind. 
Kob, Lewis M. 7 Franklin, Iowa. 
Koub, Jacob, Centropolis, Kan. 
Koub, John, Centropolis, Kansas. 
Krider, Jacob, Huntingdon, Ind. 
Kurtz, Henry, Columbiana, Ohio. 
Kurtz, Jacob, East Union, Ohio. 
Kurtz, Jacob H., Middletown, Ohio. 

L. 
Lair, John, Goshen, Ind. 
Lane, James R., Hill Valley, Pa. 
Layman, Harvey, Bonbrook, Va. 
Leatherman, George, Meyersville, Md. 
Leatherman, Peter, Middletown, Md. 
Leatherman, John. Milford, Ind. 
Leedy, Abraham, Antioch, Ind. 
Leedy, John, Dorce, Ind. 
Leedy, Jonas, New Holland, Ind. 
Leedy, Joseph, Antioch, Ind. 
Leer, Jacob, Goshen, Ind. 
Lehman, Christian,- Scalp Level, Pa. 
Lehman, Joseph C., Franklin Grove, 111. 
Lehman, Sain'l, Jr., Franklin Grove, 111. 
Lehman, Samuel, Warransville, 111. 
Lerew, J. P., York Sulphur Springs, Pa. 
Lesh, Christian, Delphi, Ind. 
Lichty, Jonas, Elklick, Pa. 
Lichty, Jonathan, Falls City, Nebraska. 
Lidy, Samuel, Nolo, Pa. 
Lierly, William R. Liberty, I1L 
Lindly, Win., Kokomo, Ind. 
Lint, C. G., Dale City, Pa. 
Livengood, David, dec'd., Elklick, Pa. 
Loehr, F. P., Blcomingdale, Mich. 
Lohr, Samuel, Donegal, Pa. 
Long, David, Fairplay, Md. 
Long, Joseph, Fairplay, Md. 
Long, Jacob F., Goginsville, Va. 
Long, Christian, Adel, Iowa. 
Long, Peter, New Germantown, Pa. 
Long,^George, Lowell, Mich. 
Long, Samuel, Haldane, 111. 
Long, Isaac, Port Republic, Va. 
Longnecker, Samuel, Montandon, Pa. 
Longnecker, Daniel, Hunterstown, Pa. 
Longnecker, Henry, Pleasant Hill, Ohio. 
Losh, Barnett, Albion, 111. 
Lutz, A. M., Winslow, HI. 
Lutz, Peter, Liberty ville, Iowa. 
Lyon, Thomas D., Hudson, Til. 

M. 
Mack, Jacob, dec'd., Vermont, 111. 



Maddocks, T. B., Clover Creek, Pa. 
Major, Thomas, Dallas, Ohio. 
Mallow, Wm. D., Roxabell, Ohio. 
Marquis, William K., Bartonia, Ind. 
Marshall, Christopher, Maple Grove, Ind. 
Martin, David. Grinnell, Iowa. 
Martin, Nicholas, Hagerstown, Md. 
Masters, Charles, Mountain Cove, W. Va. 
Mattes, Solomon, Yellow Creek, 111. 
May. Samuel, Frederick, Iowa. 
McCartey, Joseph, Arcadia, Ind. 
McClintock, W. G., Crescent Hill, Mo. 
McClintock, John, Liberty, III. 
McMullen, James, Smithville, Ohio. 
Merrill, Nathaniel, Frostburg, Md. 
Merkey, David, Bethel, Pa, 
Metzger, John W., Pettit, Ind. 
Metzger, Stephen, Rossville, Ind. 
Metzger, Henry, Camden, Ind. 
Metzger, John, Cerro Gordo, 111. 
Metzler, John, Wakarusa, Ind. 
Meyers, Henry, Falls City, Nebraska. 
Michael, Joseph, Frankfort, Kansas. 
Miller, Stephen, Milford, Ind. 
Miller, Andrew, Farmer's, Pa. 
Miller, Frederick, Cross Keys, Va. 
Miller, R. H., Ladoga, Ind. 
Miller, S. M., Waterloo, Iowa. 
Miller, Jeremiah. Jones' Mills, Pa. 
Miller, Jacob, Wood berry. Pa. 
Miller, Moses, Meehanicsburg, Pa. 
Miller, Jacob D., Somerset, Pa. 
Miller, Jacob, dec'd., South Bend, Tnd. 
Miller, Joel, Dughill, Md. 
Miller, David. Polo, .111. 
Miller, Daniel, Mercersburg, Pa. 
Miller, Ed. S„ Hagerstown, Md. 
Miller, Danieil P., Chambersburg, Pa- 
Miller, Daniel, Frederick, Iowa, 
Miller, John, Mt. Sidney, Va. 
Miller, Martin, Otterbine, Va. 
Miller, Joseph, Otterbine, Va, 
Miller, Joseph, Sangersville, Va. 
Miller, Jacob, Green Mound, Va, 
Miller, Benjamin. Green Mound, Va. 
Miller, John H., Milford, Ind. 
Miller, Jacob, German, Ohio. 
Miller, Emanuel, German, Ohio. 
Miller, Daniel. Frederick, Iowa, 
Miller, David, Rushville, 111. 
Miller, John A., Accident, Md. 
Miller, David J., Bachannon, West Va, 
Minnich, Stephen M., Antioch, Ind. 
Minser, Mark, Decker's Point, Pa. 
Mishler, John R., Mogodore, Ohio. 
Moats, John W. , Altoona, Iowa. 
Moats, John. Mt. Morris, 111. 
Mohler, Jacob, Lew'stown, Pa. 
Mohler, S. S., Cornelia, Mo. 
Mohler, Allen, Rossville, Ind. 
Mohler, Rudolph, Covington, Ohio. 
j Mohler, Samuel, Covington, Ohio. 
Molsbee, Samuel, Rogersville, Term. 



30 



Molsbee, Abraham, Rogcrsville. Tenn. 
Montz, Lewis, Milford, lnd. 
Moore, S. A., New Enterprise, Pa. 
Moore, John H., Urbana, 111. 
Moore, Alfred, Boston, lnd. 
Moore, Philip A., Secor, Ills. 
Mooinaw, B. F., Bonsacks, Ya. 
Mcomaw, John C. , Clover Dale, Va. 
Moomaw, Daniel C., Clover Dale, Ya. 
Mosser, Samuel, McVeytown, Pa. 
Mourer, George, Upton, Pa. 
Murray, Jacob, Waterloo, Iowa. 
Murray, Samuel, Huntington, lnd. 
Murray, James, Ryerson's Station, Pa 
Murray, John. Quarry, Iowa. 
Murray, David, Dayton, Ohio. 
Murray, Frederick, Jones' Mills, Pa. 
Musselman, Hiram, Scalp Level, Pa. 
Myers, Grabill, Eldorado, Pa. 
Meyers, Isaac, Mifflinburg, Pa. 
Myers, William S., Somerset, Pa. 
Myers, Peter S., McVeytown, Pa. 
Myers, Abraham, McVeytown, Pa. 
Myers, Andrew, Logansville, Pa. 
Myers, Tobias, Somerset, Pa. 
Myers, Israel, Ephrata, Pa. 
Myers, Jonathan, Antioch, Cal. * 
Myers, Joseph, Baresville, Pa. 
Myers, Samuel B., Baresville, Pa, 
Myers, Christian, Pleasant View, Pa. 
Myers, Abraham, Mt. Pleasant, Pa, 
Meyers, George S., Lewistown, Pa. 
Myers, George, Box 538 Paola, Kansas. 
Myers, Martin,^ Lenark, 111. 
Myers, Isaac, Nora, 111. 
Myers, Joseph, East Berlin, Pa. 
Myers, Samuel, Morristown, Tenn. 
Myers, John L., Fandon, 111. 
Myers, George W., Hartleton, Pa. 

N. 

Naff, Isaac, Auburn, 111. 
Nail, Joseph, Goginsville, Va. 
Nead, Peter, Dayton, Ohio. 
Nead, D. B. C, Stirrup Grove, 111. 
Neff, Daniel, New Paris, lnd. 
Neff, Isaac, Goginsville, Va. 
Neff, Henry, New Paris, lnd. 
Neff, John, Mt. Jackson, Va. 
Negley, Jacob, Ottawa, Kan. 
Neher, Andrew, Salem, 111. 
Neher, Martin, Cerro Gordo, 111. 
Neher, Daniel, Bossville, lnd. 
Neisley, David, Allen, Pa. 
Ness, Christian, Logansville, Pa, 
Newcomer, Melchor, Mt. Morris, 111. 
Newcomer, P. S., Boonsboro, Md. 
Newcomer, Emmanuel, Adaline, 111. 
Newcomer, J. S., Columbia, Pa, 
Newcomer, John, Mountville, Pa. 
Newcomer, John, Middle Springs, Pa. 
Nice, William, llarleysviHe, Pa. 
Nicholson, John. Shanes ville, Ohio. 



Nickey, B. F., Carlisle, Pa. 
Ninninger, Peter, Sr., Amsterdam, Va. 
Ninninger, Peter, Amsterdam, Va. 
Numer, A. C, Marmaton, Kansas. 

O. 

Oaks, Peter, Farmington, 111. 
Ober, David, Onberg, Pa. 
Oblinger, Samuel, Waterville, Minn. 
Ogg, Joseph, Waukokee, Minn. 
Oiler, Jacob F. , Waynesboro, Pa. 
Oltiser, Elias, Floyd C. H., Va. 
Overholtzer, Peter, Polo, Mo. 

P. 

Palmer, Harrison, Cleopatra, Mo. 

Pannebaker, William, Honey Grove, Pa. 

Pence, John, Freedom, Tenn. 

Peck, D. J., Louisville, Ohio, deceased. 

Peters, Abraham, Goginsville, Va. 

Peters, Joel, Bonbrook, Va. 

Peters, William, Seven Fountains, Va. 

Pfoutz, Abraham, Cross Kill, Pa. 

Ploutz, Isaac, Johnsville, Md. 

Pheil, Abraham, St. Thomas, Pa. 

Pheil, Adam, St. Thomas, Pa, 

Pierce, William, Arcadia, lnd. 

Pisel, Jacob, Accident, Md. 

Pippinger, John, Monomonie, Wis. 

Plaine, B. E., Panora, Iowa. 

Plaine, D. H. , Bonsacks, Va. 

Poulson, Israel, Bingold, N. J. 

Price, Isaac, Schuylkill, Pa. 

Price, Jacob, Waynesboro, Pa. 

Price, David R, Mt. Morris, 111. 

Price, J. W., Fitzwatertown, Pa., dec'd. 

Price, William, Cocalico, Pa. 

Price, Henry, Harleysville, Pa. 

Price, Jonas, Hatfield, Pa. 

Price, John, Lewistown, Pa, 

Price, John B., Pottstown, Pa. 

Priddy, David, Ozawkie, Kansas. 

Puterbaugh, George, Elkhart, lnd. 

Puterbaugh, Amsey, Elkhart, lnd. 

Province, David, Columbia, Mo. 

Q, 

Quinter, James, Covington, Ohio. 
Quinn, William H., Tyrone, Pa, 

R, 

Baffensperger, J. H., Clearsprings, Pa. 
Raffensperger, Levi, Nachusa, 111. 
Beckner, Joseph, Markleysburg, Pa. 
Reed, Isaac, Floyd C. H., Va. 
Reed, Cornelius, Floyd C. H., Va. 
Reinhold, Jacob, Lancaster, Pa. 
Renner, Isaac, Ladiesburg, Md. 
Replogle, Abraham, Union ville, Iowa. 
Replogle, J. B., Woodbury, Pa. 
Beplogle, David, Rogersville, lnd. 
Richard, A., Woodstock. Va. 
Richardson, Scott, Mill Grove, lnd. 



31 



Riddle, Samuel, Highland, Iowa. 
Ridenour, Jas. A. , Brandonville, W . V*. 
Rider, Jacob, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Riner, Jacob K., Line Lexington, Pa. 
Rinehart, Joseph, Ipava, 111 
Rinehart, John, Erving, Ind. 
Riffee, JohnR., Jane Lew, West Va. 
Rife, Jacob, Boston, Ind. 
Rife, John, Burnettsville, Ind. 
Rinker, George S., Middletown, Va. 
Rittenhouse, Jos., Chatham Centre, 0. 
Rittenhouse, David, Mt, Carroll, 111. 
Roadcap, Martin, Middletown, Ind. 
Roberts, C. P. L. , Waterloo, Iowa. 
Robey, William H., River Falls, Wis. 
Rodearmel, Jeremiah, Reading, Pa. 
Rohrer, Joseph R, Smithbuvg, Md. 
Roland, David, Clayli^k, Pa. 
Roop, David, Attica, Ohio. 
Roop, Israel, Attica, Ohio. 
Roop, Jesse, Linganore, Md. 
Root, C. C, Mirabile, Mo. 
Root, Andrew, Ozawkie, Kansas. 
Root, John, A,, Oz?wkie, Kansas. 
Rothanuel, Joshua, Leesport, Pa. 
Rowland, David W., Westminister, md. 
Royer, Isaac, Queen City, Mo. 
Rover, Charles, Mifflinburg, Pa. 
Rudy, Isaac L. , Nankin Ohio. 
Rupel, David, North Liberty, Ind. 
Rupp, Christ, Baresville, Pa. 

S. 

Sadler, William, Nankin, Ohio. 
Sawyer, H. H,, Claytonville. Kansas. 
Sayler, D. P. , Double Pipe Creek, md. 
Sayer, D, R., Douple Pipe Creek, Md. 
Sayler, Daniel K., Johnsville, Md, 
Sayler, Henry, Johnsville, Md. 
Schrock, Geerge, Berlin, Pa. 
Schrack, John C., Somerset, Pa. 
Sell, James A., Newry, Pa. 
Sell, Joseph B., Altoona, Pa. 
Sell, Daniel D. Plattsburg, Mo. 
Sell, William B : , Hamilton. Mo. 
Sell, Abraham, Hamilton, Mo. 
Sellars, John, Bourbon, Ind. 
Sellars, G-eorge, Mt. Carroll, 111. 
Senseney, A. II., Uniontowd, Md. 
Seiber, Solomon, Thomsontown, Pa. 
Sergon, Stephen, Jonesville, Ya. 
Shamberger, Jacob, Beckleysville, Md. 
Shank, John, Greencastle, Pa. 
Sharp, S. Z., Marysville, Tenn. 
Shaver, S. A., Maurertown, Va. 
Shaver, E. B., Maurertown, Va. 
Shaver, G-eorge, Mourertown, Va, 
Sherfey, Joseph, Gettysburg, Pa. 
Sherfay, S. S., Johnson's Depot, Tenn. 
Shicleler, Daniel, Mejenica, Ind. 
Shirk, Isaac W v Akron, Pa, 
Shirk, Isaac, Ephrata, Pa. 
Shirk, Jacob B., Eldora, Iowa. 



Shiveley, Joel, Osceola, Ind. 
Shiveley, David, Bourbon, Ind. 
Shiveley, Jacob B., Inwood, Ind, 
Shiveley, John, Pyrmont, Ind. 
Shively, Daniel, New Paris, Ind. 
Shiveley, Aaron, Bayard, Ohio. 
Shong, Daniel, Brunersburg, Ohio. 
Shontz, John, Tiffin, Ohio. 
Shoup, Mores, Zimmerman, Ohio. 
Showalter, Christ J., Big Tree, Pa, 
Shoemaker, J. B., Smithville, Ohio. 
Shuler, Moses, Wescosville, Pa. 
Simmons, Christian, Rogersville, Tenn. 
Simmons, William, union City, Ind. 
Sipe, Aaron, Kokomo, Ind. 
Sipler, Michael, Mt. Carroll, 111. 
Sivitz, William, Berlin, Pa, 
Slifer, Emmanuel, Burkitsville, Md. 
Slusser, J. H., Floyd C. H., Va, 
Smith, Daniel, Hagerstown, Ind. 
Smith, William, Haldane, 111. 
Smith, George, Pine Grove, Pa. 
Smith, John, Little River, Va. 
Smith, John, Dayton, Ohio. 
Smith, David, Union Deposit, Pa. 
Smith, Bartley, Hollowtown, Ohio. 
Snavely, John Y., Hudson, 111. 
Snowberger, Joseph, Williamsburg, Pa. 
Snowberger, Daniel, New Enterprise, Pa, 
Snowberger, Andrew, Bloody Run, Pa. 
Snowberger, JohnS., Monticello, Ind. 
Snyder, Aaron B., Urbana, 111. 
Snyder, Adam F., Kingwood, Pa. 
Snyder, Thomas G., Dry Creek, Iowa. 
Snyder, J. S., Brooklyn, Iowa, 
Sollenberger, Joseph, White House, Pa. 
Spangler, John, Little River, Va. 
Spanogle, Andrew, Shirleysburg, Pa. 
Spanogle, John, Hill Valley, Pa. 
Spanogle, J., 1116 Green st,, PhiIa.,Pa. 
Spanogle, Andrew, Lewistown, Pa. 
Spicher, J. W., Hillsdale, Pa, 
Spicher, J., Waterloo, Iowa. 
Spidle, David, Grand River, Iowa. 
Stamy, Abraham, Dry Creek, Iowa. 
Stamy, Soloman, Dry Creek, Iowa. 
Stamv, John F , Lee's Cross Roads, Pa. 
Steel, Jacob, Yellow Creek, Pa. 
Steel, Elias, Walkerton, Ind. 
Stiteley, David, Johnsville, Md. 
Stoner, Eli, Somerset, Ohio. 
Stoner, E. W., Union Bridge, Md. 
Stoner, Soloman, Uniontown, Md. 
Stong, George W, Walnut, Pa. 
Stover, Jacob A., Greencastle, Pa. 
Stouffer, D. F., Benevola, Md. 
St ouffer, Menno, Cerro, Gordo, 111. 
Stout, William J., High Point, Iowa, 
Strjckler, William E,, Centreville, Iowa. 
Strickler, Henry, P., Eldora, Iowa. 
Struphaar, Joshua, Syllaman, Pa. 
Studabaker, George W., Muncie, Ind, 
Studabaker, Jesse, Pleasant Hill, Ohio. 



32 



Studebaker, Daniel, Clinton, Kansas. 
Studebaker, Jacob, Goshen, Ind. 
Studebaker, Isaac, 'West Charleston, 0. 
Studebaker, Isaac, Casstown, Ohio. 
Studebaker, J. U., Eaton, Ind. 
Sturgis, D. B., South Bend, Ind. 
Stmtzman, Daniel B., West Charleston, 0. 

Stutzman, Abraham, , . 

Summy, A 
Swadley, - 
Swigart, S 

Swigart, G Date Due 

Swihart, J 

Swonger, J 



Tabler, Jau 
Tallhelm, ] 
Tennis, Sa- 
Thornas, M 
Thomas, V 
Thomas, J, 
Thomas, M- 
Thomas, J< 
Thomas, M- 
Thomas, J, 
Thorn pson,- 
Thompson, 
Trostle, Ja*- 
Trostie, Le 
Troxel, He- 



Ullery, Da\ 
Ullery, San- 
Ulrich, Job 
Umbaugh, - 
Umbel, Sai 
Umbel, An- 
Um stead, J 



Vandyke, A 
Vaniman, I 
Vaught, G<- 
Vorhees, Is 



PRINTED 



\\ eaver, Joseph, Brimfield, Ind. 
Weaver, Moses, Ashland, Ohio. 
Weber. John, Elkhart, Iowa • 
Wells, Levi, Piumville, Pa. 
Wengert, C, South Bend, Ind. 
Wenrick, Thomas B., Union City, Ind. 
Wertz, Christian, Cave Springs, Va. 
West. Landon. Sinking Springs Ohio. 



l'set, Pa. 
Boston, Minn. 
Kills, Md. 
ille, Pa. 
p, Tenn. 






Wagoner, J 

Wakeman, (| 

Wakeman, 
Walker, Daniel P., Berlin. Pa. 
Walker, S. A., Bloom ville, Ohio. 
Wallick, Alex. B., Breedsville, Mich. 
Wampler, Philip, Dayton, Ohio. 
Warn pier, Joseph, Knobnoster, Mo. 
Wampler, Samuel, Broadway Depot, Va, 
Wampler, Fred. Broadway Depot, Va. 
Wanderlich, Charles, Richland, Iowa. 
Warner, Jon ithan, Reiffsburg, Ind. 
Watters, Jacob 0., Dry Creek, Iowa. 
Weael, Harvey, Floyd C H., Va. 
Weaver, Chiistian, Brimfield, Lnd. 



IN U. S. A. 



on Station, Pa,- 
r a. 

bine, Va. 
)ine, Va. 
Depot, Va. 
e, Tenn. 

reek, Pa. 

Minn. 
^est Va. 
d. 

Pa. 

Ohio. 
1, Ohio, 
n, Mo. 



L. 



Cal. 
Id. 
Md. 

rille, Pa. 
d, Ohio. 
), Ind. 
iburg, Ohio. 
burg, Ohio. 
i Bend. Ind. 



ton, Iowa. 
g, Ohio, 
lie, Iowa. 
Ind. 



fid. 
Ohio. 
, Va. 



Zeigler, Samuel, Broadway Depot, Ya„ 
Ziegler, Philip, Mastersonville, Pa. 
Ziegler, Joseph, Merriam, Ind. 
Zook, Daniel, Unionville, Iowa- 
Zook, David, Farmington, 111. 
Zook, John, Shady Grove, Pa- 
Zook, Joseph, Unionville, Iowa, 
Zug, S. R-, Mastersonville, Pa* 
Zug, John, Shaefferstown, Pa. 



MANCHESTER COLLEGE LIBRARY 




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5 01027579 7 




S* Manchester College ♦? 

♦3 




RETHREN HISTORICAL 



gj^U.^LlBRARY 



\Jfr&A^^&» *&> «&• *&* *&* <&> > 
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RTH MANCHESTER, 

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Studebakt 
Studebak* 
Studebake 
Studebak( 
Studebake 
Sturgis, D 
Stutzman, 
Stutzman, 
Summy, A 
Swadley, • 
Swigart, S 
Swigart, G 

Swihart, J , _ 

Swonger, Michael, DeGraff, Ohio. 

T. 

Tabler, James, D., Middletown, Va. 
Tallhelm, Humphrey, Maysville, Iowa. 
Tennis, Samuel, Fairview, 111. 
Thomas, Michael J., Shinbone, Pa. 
Thomas, William, Shinbone, Pa, 
Thomas, Jacob M. , Brandonville, W. Va. 
Thomas, Michael, Somerfield, Pa. 
Thomas, John, Washington, Iowa. 
Thomas, Michael J. , Carrollton, Pa. 
Thomas, Jacob, Otterbine, Va. 
Thompson, Archibald, Whitesburg, Tenn. 
Thompson, Joshua, Ovid, Ind. 
Trostle, Jacob D., Linganore,. Md. 
Trostle, Lev], Taylor, 111. 
Troxelj Henry, Cerro Gordo, 111. 

U. 

Ullery, David, Osceola, Mo. 
Ullery, Samuel, Pyrmont, Ind. 
Ulrich, John H., Huntingdon, Ind. 
Umbaugh, Jonas, Pierceton, Ind. 
Umbel, Samuel 0. , Markleysburg. Pa. 
Umbel, Andrew, Markleysburg, Pa. 
Umstead, John H., Port Providence, Pa. 

V. 

Vandyke, Archy, Lewistown, Pa. 
Vaniman, Daniel, Virden, 111. 
Vaught, George, Elizabeth, West Va, 
Vorhees, Isaac, Wakarusa, Ind. 

W. 

Wagoner, Jacob, Petit, Ind. 
Wakeman, John W., Water Lick, Va. 
Wake in an, J., St r as burg-, Va. 
Walker, Daniel P., Berlin, Pa. 
Walker, S. A., Bloom ville, Ohio. 
Wallick, Alex. B., Breedsville, Mich. 
Wampler, Philip, Dayton, Ohio. 
Warn pier, Joseph, Knobnoster, Mo. 
Wampler, Samuel, Broadway Depot, Va, 
Wampler, Fred. Broadway Depot, Va. 
Wanderlich, Charles, Bicliland, Iowa. 
Warner, Jon ithan, Reiffsburg, Ind. 
Watters, Jacob 0., Dry Creek, Iowa. 
Weael, Harvey, Floyd C H,, Va. 
Weaver, Chiistian, Brimfield, Ind. 



Id, Ind. 

Ohio, 
owa. • 

a. 

d, Ind. 
lion City, Ind. 
prings, Va. 
Springs, Ohio. 

•set, Pa. 
Boston, Minn. 
[ills, Md. 
ille, Pa. 






— tt in ua-uio, .Ltuuiyit, j_ 1ULU 

White, Pleasant, Bull Gap, Tenn. 
Wickham, L. C.,Vilot, Va. 
Wimer, Frederick, Dawson Station, Pa 
Wine, John, Otterbine, Va. 
Wine, George, Sr.,. Otterbine, Va. 
Wine, George, Jr., Otterbine, Va, 
Wine, Christ. , Broadway Depot, Va. 
Wine, Josenh, Blountviile, Tenn. 
Wineland, J. L., Clover Creek, Pa. 
Wirt, C. F., New Boston, Minn. 
Wise, Adam, Cameron, West Va. 
Wise, David, Camden, Ind. 
Wise, John, Scenery Hill, Pa. 
Witmer, D. M., Ashland, Ohio. 
Witmore,- Jacob, Diuikird, Ohio- 
Witwer. George, Hamilton, Mo. 
Wolfe, David, Liberty, 111. 
Wolfe, George, Stockton, Cal. 
Wolfe, Daniel, Fairplay, Md. 
Wolfe. J. M., Chewsville, Md. 
Wood, George, Shippensville, Pa 
Workman, David. Ashland, Ohio. 
Workman, Levi, Pierceton, Ind. 
Worst, George, New Pittsburg, Ohio, 
Worst, Henry, New Pittsburg, Ohio. • 
Wrightsman, P. li,, South Bend, Ind. 

Y. 

Yoder, Stephen, Washington, Iowa. 
Yoder, E. L., Madisonburg, Ohio. 
Yoder, Jacob D.. Unionville, Iowa.. 
Younce, Davis, Pierceton, Ind. 
Young, Daniel, Upton, Pa. 
Young, Adam, Idaville, Ind. 
Young, David, Mogodore, Ohio. 
Yount. Daniel, New Hope, Va.. 

Z. 

Zeigler, Samuel, Broadway Depot, Va. 
Ziegler, Philip, Mastersonville, Pa. 
Ziegler, Joseph, Merriam, Ind. 
Zook, Daniel, Unionville, Iowa - 
Zook, David, Farmington, 111. 
Zook, John, Shady Grove, Pa- 
Zook, Joseph, Unionville, Iowa, 
Zug, S. It-, Mastersonville, Pa* 
Zug, John, Shaefferstown, Pa. 




MANCHESTER COLLEGE LIBRARY 




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RETHREN HISTORICAL 
S^lo.S^LlBRARY 



\J?^^A»^^^. -^ <&* *&» «*>» ^^> !*kD 

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